Welcome to My Blog

How Using Humans And Chatbots Together Generated 182% More Qualified Leads

This post is a part of Made @ HubSpot, an internal thought leadership series through which we extract lessons from experiments conducted by our very own HubSpotters.

Prospect expectations for businesses have never been higher — in fact, according to Google, 61% of people now expect brands to deliver personalized experiences. 

At the same time, the amount of people who want to reach a business through messaging continues to rise. Which means keeping up on chat can be tough, even for well-trained teams.

At HubSpot, we felt the brunt of that pain in early 2018. We have a specific sales team that handles chatting with people on our website. At the time, we’d been using live chat across most of HubSpot.com to engage with prospects in a way that felt natural.

Unfortunately, sales leadership began noticing we were losing out on valuable, high-intent prospects who were attempting to reach us via live chat. We simply didn’t have a guaranteed way of ensuring their needs were addressed by a member of our team — which meant we were losing out on potential sales, big time.

When my marketing team at HubSpot connected with the sales team to discuss the issue, we recognized live chat alone no longer suited our needs. To appropriately communicate with each prospect and create that highly personalized experience our website visitors crave, we needed to scale our sales team’s productivity with a chatbot.

Here, we’ll explore why we decided to build a chatbot, how we designed the experience, and why it might be an outstanding solution for your own business in 2019 — and beyond.

Why Live Chat Didn’t Work For Us

When the live chat sales team reached out to us, we knew we needed to make the team more efficient.

Live chat in-and-of-itself wasn’t a problem — but, unfortunately, we weren’t tailoring the conversations to the visitor and their problems. We knew sifting through each and every visitor’s inquiry was the right thing to do, since it helped solve for the customer and answer any prospect’s questions.

But, since they all fell under the same bucket, it became increasingly difficult for the sales team to keep up. And for the majority of people who didn’t leave us with a way to get back in touch, they were gone forever.

At one point, over a third of the people who chatted with us
never heard anything back.

Additionally, hundreds of the chats we received each month were from users who simply needed product support. This ate part of our sales team’s valuable bandwidth, making it harder for them to get in touch with site visitors who actually needed to speak with a sales rep.

Ultimately, this poor experience added unnecessary friction for our site visitors and sales reps.

Why We Decided to Build a Chatbot

After some internal discussion, we set out to build a chatbot that would engage with visitors, triage them, and get them to the right place, sooner. This would be a win-win for both visitors to our site, and the sales team.

To figure out what this chatbot should do, we first looked at live chat transcripts. They’re an invaluable resource when doing conversational marketing, since you can hear in the prospect’s own words what they want to do. There are technical ways to classify chats (like natural language processing), but a qualitative approach is fine to start.

We then bucketed intents from live chat into three buckets — sales, support, and a catch-all “other”. To start the chatbot, we prompted people to select the topic that best matched their intent.

After speaking with our support team, we learned that getting technical help with a product while on the website can be tricky. There are rich and thorough resources better-suited for getting these kinds of answers. So, rather than keeping someone in the chatbot, we used what we know about them in the CRM to point them in the right direction. The chatbot would look at their contact record, and then serve up a contextual web page depending on the products they were using.

Even though our prospects couldn’t connect with a human right away, we set them up for better long-term success.

hubspot chatbot example

Next, we recognized a large percentage of the people who interacted with live chat did, in fact, want to talk to our sales team. But that didn’t mean trying to connect them to a human right away was efficient for either group.

We interviewed and observed the sales team to understand their experience with chat. Right away, we noticed each sales rep needed to know three key facts about the user to tailor the conversation to their business — name, email, and website.

The sales team said in an ideal world, they wanted this context before chatting with a prospect — an issue we knew a chatbot could solve. We programmed the chatbot to collect this information in a natural, contextual way.

Additionally, we knew a prospect would become frustrated if they needed to repeat themselves — in fact, NewVoiceMedia found it to be the most frustrating aspect of customer experience. To combat this issue, we again checked the CRM, and if you’d ever filled out a HubSpot form, we’d skip the questions altogether.

Collecting this information up-front enabled the sales team to spend more time selling, and less time chasing down email addresses.

Our Results

At the beginning of this project, our main goal was to deflect support-related chats away from our sales team. But, even as someone who has been building chatbots for almost four years, I’ll admit — what we saw was shocking.

When compared to live chat, 75% more people engaged with the chatbot.

Additionally, over 55% of people gave real answers to the basic qualifying questions and reached a human. While the drop-off there may seem steep, sifting out low-intent people proved incredibly helpful for the sales team.

hubspot chatbot results

Ultimately, our chatbot’s success came in a few ways — first, the chatbot anticipated the next step of the conversation and used quick replies to drive a visitor forward. Opening up a chat and clicking a contextual button has less friction than typing in a text field — now, people didn’t need to come up with the first message themselves.

It makes sense that multiple choice options drive more engagement. Think of it this way — when you meet someone new, often the hardest part of the conversation is the beginning, when you’re trying to think of something to say. But once the conversation starts rolling, things become smoother.

The same is true for our prospects when they engage with a chatbot versus live chat.

Additionally, 9% of people who chatted with the bot needed support help — we were able to deflect those visitors away from humans in a helpful way, serving up the best place to get answers to their questions quickly.

It’s important to note when designing conversations, the hardest and most overlooked aspect is to write like a human. As consumers, we rarely process in our heads that we want to “talk to sales”. Instead, we only know we want to talk about “products I’m not yet using”. Writing with the “jobs to be done” in mind is a great philosophy for conversational design.

how chatbot generated more qualified leads hubspot

Takeaways for Your Business

At the end of the experiment, I’ve found a few takeaways that can help you and your business succeed, as well.

First, chatbots are a great opportunity to meet your visitors where they are. If you want to get started with a chatbot, look at chat transcripts, or interview your sales team to understand the types of questions people typically ask. Bucket those questions into a few critical categories.

Also, it’s critical you and your team think through and anticipate the best way to help those various buckets of people. The more you can personalize — perhaps through your CRM — the better.

Ultimately, using a chatbot to get people the help they need is a huge win for both your prospects and your business. In our case, site visitors now had the best resources for their support issues, and our sales team was able to capture more qualified leads.

The best part? Both sides did this in a frictionless, efficient way.

Editor’s note: This post was originally written in February 2019 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.

How HubSpot Personalized Our Chatbots to Improve The Customer Experience and Support Our Sales Team

This post is a part of Made @ HubSpot, an internal thought  leadership series through which we extract lessons from experiments conducted by our very own HubSpotters.

You can’t talk about the future of marketing without chatbots. People are increasingly interested in communicating with brands in a more personal, conversational way — and chatbots can help.

Including chatbots on your website helps visitors find what they are looking for and connect them with your team in an immediate, frictionless way. Chatbots also follow the Inbound Messaging Framework.

chatbots inbound messaging framework

So, what are the secrets to building a chatbot strategy?

On HubSpot’s marketing team, we seek to deliver a world-class customer experience. We consistently ask: How can chatbots better serve our various audiences (visitors, leads, and customers) to help direct them to the right resources for their needs? Also, how can we use chatbots to support our sales team and reach our goals?

Use HubSpot’s free Chatbot Builder Software to easily build and launch chatbots on your website — no coding required.

A Customer-Focused Bot Experience

Chatbots work when they’re contextual and relevant to specific problems folks are having. Through conversations with our sales team, we learned that 15% of chat questions on the website were about getting technical support. We were creating friction for our customers because our sales team (who answers chat questions onsite) is not as well equipped to answer these questions as our support team is.

So, we created a bot to direct our customers to the right resources for technical support (our support team, knowledgebase, and community). If they were not looking for technical support, we passed their questions about HubSpot features and pricing to our sales team.

chatbots improve customer experience

We rolled out these bots across the primary site pages and saw an 80% increase in our sales team efficiency: a measure of success based on the number of meetings we booked divided by the total number of chats handled. And, it was a far better customer experience, as our customers could access technical support more easily.

It was a big win, but our work was hardly done. As we took a step back, we realized that this “support bot” experience was not serving all of our users. About 70% of our audience is visitors and leads, compared with 30% who are users and customers. This first bot experience was designed with only 30% of our audience in mind. Ignoring 70% of our audience meant we were leaving money on the table.

A Personalized Experience for All Visitors

We needed to create a personalized experience for the visitor and lead audiences, too.

With the “support bot” experience, it was odd to ask visitors and leads if they needed support when we knew they weren’t using our tools yet. Rather than directing visitors and leads to chat or support, we wanted to give these visitors their own “self-help” option. Why not give them the option to get started for free with the HubSpot CRM? That way they could start using our free tools or chat with our sales team about features and pricing for advanced tools.

hubspot hubbot example

Now we had designed two personalized experiences: one for those already using our software (customers) and those who had yet to experience it (visitors).

We believed this to be a better experience for each audience, because it offered contextual options based on their relationship with HubSpot. However, we wanted to test it first with an experiment.

Setting Up the Experiment

In order to test our hypothesis that this would be a better experience for both of these users, we set up an A/B test on one of our product pages so we could see exactly how the bot for visitors performed against the current bot experience (designed for customers).

First, we defined our metrics for success. We looked at:

  • Sales team efficiency: # of meetings booked by our sales team ÷ the number of chats they handled
  • # of signups for the CRM

We also compared these for each bot (control vs. variant), and by each audience (visitors vs. customer).

We chose one of our product pages and directed 50% of its site traffic to a cloned page with the new bot experience. The test was live and ready to run for one month while we waited (somewhat) patiently for the results.

chatbots improve customer experience gif

Me, waiting at my desk

Experiment Results

We isolated our results for the audience the test was focused on: visitors. We looked at how the control (support bot) performed against the variant (lead bot).

  • Sales team efficiency: increased by almost 70% in the variant
  • # of CRM signups: increased by 7%

The increase in CRM signups indicated that visitors were finding the right option for them (starting for free) and diving in to try out our software for free.

As a result, fewer chats reached our sales team, but we saw a similar number of meetings booked to continue the sales conversation after a chat. This meant a couple of things:

  1. The sales team was able to spend more time and focus on higher quality chats that were more likely to turn into sales
  2. We weren’t losing demand, because we still saw a similar number of meetings booked. We were still capturing those interested in having a sales conversation, just in a more efficient way.

Better segmentation makes life better for everyone. Making a bot personalized for visitors helped the customers’ bot perform better as well. We learned the customer bot works very well for the audience it was designed for — performing 52% better when shown only to customers than when it was shown to all visitors.

Takeaways for Your Business

It’s important to recognize that different segments of your audience have different problems and what works for one audience isn’t the best for another. By understanding the problems that our visitors are facing, and personalizing their chatbot experience onsite, you can create a better prospect and customer experience. When you anticipate the help that people need better, your metrics will improve as well.

And you may be thinking, “OK, that sounds pretty good for HubSpot, but what about my business? How can I create a more contextual bot experience for my business?” Here’s how:

  1. Create a list of the various audiences you are serving on your website.
  2. For each audience, describe the types of questions they might have.
  3. Determine the resources or people who can best answer those questions so you can help them find what they are looking for faster and with less friction.

Then implement it! The HubSpot Conversations tool gives you the ability to target your chat flows with segmented lists based on data in your CRM so you can create a personalized experience as well.

Chatbots work shoulder-to-shoulder alongside with our sales team to provide an excellent, personalized purchase experience that also helps us identify visitors who are possible good fit customers.

Chatbots can do the same for your business and audience.

Editor’s note: This post was originally published in July 2019 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.

 

Upstream vs. Downstream Marketing, Explained

How many times have you seen a term for something you already knew about? This probably happens a lot, right?

 For example, before I took marketing classes in college, I had no idea that there was a term for making sure your content has a better chance of ranking highly on search engines. (Hint: This is search engine optimization, or SEO).

You may already know about upstream and downstream marketing. When I learned what these two terms meant, I found myself saying, “Oh, so that’s what it’s called!

You’re probably here for the same reason. So, let’s talk about the difference between these two terms and how they work together. Are you ready for a quick introduction to upstream and downstream marketing?

Upstream Marketing

Upstream marketing is a long-term plan. It allows for marketers to conceptualize a timeline for future releases based on customer segments. To create an upstream marketing plan, start with a section of your audience that you want to focus on in the next year or so.

The definition of upstream marketing.

Your completed upstream plan should include the following:

  • Identification of a portion of your audience’s problems
  • A product or service that will solve those challenges
  • A price and competitive edge for campaign assets

First, identify the challenges your customers are facing. Do this by referring to your buyer persona and researching the current market as well as gathering feedback from current customers.

For instance, let’s say your company offers a CRM and your team decides to use an upstream plan for improving the enterprise-level tier of offerings. The first step is to identify consumers’ pain points. After analyzing market and feedback data, you find that enterprise customers want software that will simplify testing campaign assets.

Enterprise-level customers need sophisticated, scalable software that enables them to analyze campaigns and engagement metrics. You and your team decide that’s where your new product is going to come in — it will focus on helping customers analyze campaigns that are impactful.

You decide on adding an adaptive testing feature to your CRM. It first will allow customers to automatically test web page performance for metrics like click-through rate, conversions, and session time. They can use that data to improve the effectiveness of those pages.

With the challenge and solution figured out, think about how much the tool will cost and how it can be set apart from the market. If you included competitor data in your research process, you can refer to it at this step to strategize your product’s market edge.

This strategy looks similar to deciding on a price. Factor in your customer segment, competitor pricing, and your own pricing model. With this information, you ultimately decide that the tool will be an add-on to your existing enterprise tier, and the marketing edge will be that the service is a complementary update.

Conceptualizing a product, its price, and its competitive edge sounds like it would happen pretty early on in the marketing process, right? It is, and, in fact, it should be done before considering downstream marketing. Upstream marketing helps companies plan roll-outs by providing a bird’s eye view of what can be expected in the long-term.

Now, you’ve come up with the who, what, when, where, why, and how. An adaptive testing feature will be added for enterprise-level customers within your company’s CRM within the next year. The marketing strategy will focus on its increased value for the enterprise tier.

With this plan in place, you can solidify a downstream process.

Downstream Marketing

If upstream marketing is the “big picture” planning session, downstream is the game plan. So, for the CRM company, the next step is to come up with a campaign strategy. That process involves downstream marketing.

The definition of downstream marketing.

Downstream marketing is more short-term than upstream marketing. It strategizes marketing campaigns and asks the question, “What resources can we leverage to make the customer want our product?

Sometimes, downstream is used interchangeably with general marketing practices: Coming up with processes and activities that will effectively communicate the value of a product or service. This isn’t wrong.

Because the upstream process identified the product, its price, and its competitive edge, the downstream method can use this information to produce an informative, engaging campaign.

Your CRM company, at this point, will now have to decide the framework for your adaptive testing campaign. Think about what social media channels you will leverage, the angle of the promotional video, and offers you may want to draft. Decide how you will communicate the release of your updates to customers and leads.

For instance, in this step, you may decide to use LinkedIn Ads, email marketing, and an ebook offer. These channels will be used to acquire leads, excite existing customers, and explain how the update adds value to the existing product.

Upstream Marketing vs. Downstream Marketing

When upstream and downstream work together, the result is a smooth product development cycle that keeps marketing in mind. The two help you build the bones of a campaign at an early stage.

Let’s go back to the CRM company example. You used upstream marketing to come up with a product of value for your existing customers. It helped you to identify its market edge and campaign cycle.

Then, using downstream marketing, you developed a framework for the overall marketing strategy. You decided which channels would reach enterprise-level customers effectively. You decided how branding will play a part in solidifying the growth of your product, and how to shape messaging that will connect to your audience.

The two can create focused campaigns because they identify a customer segment, challenge, and benefit to be used for effective messaging. It keeps teams on the same track, even if the upstream ideas have to change.

For the long-term, what are some of the ways you plan to use both in future planning?

How to Use LinkedIn Lead Gen Form Ads

Want to capture more leads from LinkedIn? Are you using the right ad format and conversion objective to generate leads? In this article, you’ll learn how to set up and use a lead generation form in a Sponsored Content ad campaign on LinkedIn. You’ll also discover tips to optimize your lead gen form ads to […]

The post How to Use LinkedIn Lead Gen Form Ads appeared first on Social Media Examiner | Social Media Marketing.

from Social Media Examiner | Social Media Marketing https://ift.tt/39VVc8k
via socialmediaexaminer

Upstream vs. Downstream Marketing, Explained

How many times have you seen a term for something you already knew about? This probably happens a lot, right?

 For example, before I took marketing classes in college, I had no idea that there was a term for making sure your content has a better chance of ranking highly on search engines. (Hint: This is search engine optimization, or SEO).

You may already know about upstream and downstream marketing. When I learned what these two terms meant, I found myself saying, “Oh, so that’s what it’s called!

You’re probably here for the same reason. So, let’s talk about the difference between these two terms and how they work together. Are you ready for a quick introduction to upstream and downstream marketing?

Upstream Marketing

Upstream marketing is a long-term plan. It allows for marketers to conceptualize a timeline for future releases based on customer segments. To create an upstream marketing plan, start with a section of your audience that you want to focus on in the next year or so.

The definition of upstream marketing.

Your completed upstream plan should include the following:

  • Identification of a portion of your audience’s problems
  • A product or service that will solve those challenges
  • A price and competitive edge for campaign assets

First, identify the challenges your customers are facing. Do this by referring to your buyer persona and researching the current market as well as gathering feedback from current customers.

For instance, let’s say your company offers a CRM and your team decides to use an upstream plan for improving the enterprise-level tier of offerings. The first step is to identify consumers’ pain points. After analyzing market and feedback data, you find that enterprise customers want software that will simplify testing campaign assets.

Enterprise-level customers need sophisticated, scalable software that enables them to analyze campaigns and engagement metrics. You and your team decide that’s where your new product is going to come in — it will focus on helping customers analyze campaigns that are impactful.

You decide on adding an adaptive testing feature to your CRM. It first will allow customers to automatically test web page performance for metrics like click-through rate, conversions, and session time. They can use that data to improve the effectiveness of those pages.

With the challenge and solution figured out, think about how much the tool will cost and how it can be set apart from the market. If you included competitor data in your research process, you can refer to it at this step to strategize your product’s market edge.

This strategy looks similar to deciding on a price. Factor in your customer segment, competitor pricing, and your own pricing model. With this information, you ultimately decide that the tool will be an add-on to your existing enterprise tier, and the marketing edge will be that the service is a complementary update.

Conceptualizing a product, its price, and its competitive edge sounds like it would happen pretty early on in the marketing process, right? It is, and, in fact, it should be done before considering downstream marketing. Upstream marketing helps companies plan roll-outs by providing a bird’s eye view of what can be expected in the long-term.

Now, you’ve come up with the who, what, when, where, why, and how. An adaptive testing feature will be added for enterprise-level customers within your company’s CRM within the next year. The marketing strategy will focus on its increased value for the enterprise tier.

With this plan in place, you can solidify a downstream process.

Downstream Marketing

If upstream marketing is the “big picture” planning session, downstream is the game plan. So, for the CRM company, the next step is to come up with a campaign strategy. That process involves downstream marketing.

The definition of downstream marketing.

Downstream marketing is more short-term than upstream marketing. It strategizes marketing campaigns and asks the question, “What resources can we leverage to make the customer want our product?

Sometimes, downstream is used interchangeably with general marketing practices: Coming up with processes and activities that will effectively communicate the value of a product or service. This isn’t wrong.

Because the upstream process identified the product, its price, and its competitive edge, the downstream method can use this information to produce an informative, engaging campaign.

Your CRM company, at this point, will now have to decide the framework for your adaptive testing campaign. Think about what social media channels you will leverage, the angle of the promotional video, and offers you may want to draft. Decide how you will communicate the release of your updates to customers and leads.

For instance, in this step, you may decide to use LinkedIn Ads, email marketing, and an ebook offer. These channels will be used to acquire leads, excite existing customers, and explain how the update adds value to the existing product.

Upstream Marketing vs. Downstream Marketing

When upstream and downstream work together, the result is a smooth product development cycle that keeps marketing in mind. The two help you build the bones of a campaign at an early stage.

Let’s go back to the CRM company example. You used upstream marketing to come up with a product of value for your existing customers. It helped you to identify its market edge and campaign cycle.

Then, using downstream marketing, you developed a framework for the overall marketing strategy. You decided which channels would reach enterprise-level customers effectively. You decided how branding will play a part in solidifying the growth of your product, and how to shape messaging that will connect to your audience.

The two can create focused campaigns because they identify a customer segment, challenge, and benefit to be used for effective messaging. It keeps teams on the same track, even if the upstream ideas have to change.

For the long-term, what are some of the ways you plan to use both in future planning?

What Is Co-Marketing? A Guide to Co-Branding Marketing Campaigns

As marketers, we are always looking for new ways to get more bang for our buck. Co-marketing allows you to do just that — the process involves two or more companies working together to reap the benefits of their combined efforts.

We’ve compiled the co-marketing tips and tricks below to help you create a successful co-marketing campaign and relationship, from start to finish.

Partner companies typically collaborate on promotional efforts for a co-branded offer. In a co-marketing partnership, both companies promote a piece of content or product, and share the results of that promotion.

By levering the relationship and reach of a partner, co-marketing campaigns are designed to deliver more leads, buzz, and awareness, with less work.

Co-Marketing vs. Co-Branding

You’ve probably heard the terms co-marketing and co-branding thrown around quite a bit — but what’s the difference? Is there one?

Turns out, they’re actually pretty similar.

While co-branding refers to a partnership in which two companies combine their products or expertise to create an even more valuable product or offer (Think: Doritos Locos Tacos), co-marketing takes things a step further.

Co-marketing campaigns provide teams with an opportunity to work together to promote a shared offer — such as a co-branded product or piece of content. In a co-marketing partnership, both companies promote that offer, and share the results of that promotion with each other.

More on how this process works next.

How does co-marketing work?

The most common way to co-market is for two companies that have similar audiences to work together on a piece of content or campaign, and promote it to both audiences.

This content (e.g. ebook, webinar, template, etc.) typically sits behind a lead generation form to capture contact information. The goal is for both partners to share the downloads from the offer, thus getting twice the leads that they normally would.

But that’s not the only way to carry out a co-marketing campaign. Straying from the approach above, two partners might agree to host an event together and split the costs. Or, on a smaller scale, partners could agree to a series of guest blog posts on each other’s sites.

The most important thing when deciding to do co-marketing with a certain partner, is to make sure the purpose and goal of the project is similar for both parties. If one partner wants leads, but another is looking for ticket sales to their annual event, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a project that satisfies both needs.

One aspect of virtually every co-marketing campaign you’ll need is a shared landing page.

Co-Marketing Shared Landing Page

Both your content and landing page should be co-branded — and it should be obvious. This entails using both partner’s logos in the header, and mentioning both partners throughout the content.

Since you will likely be sharing the offer’s downloads with your partner, you will need to consult with your legal team about the proper disclaimer to include at the bottom of the form.

For example, our offer with Google simply states that we are authorized to share their information with the specific partner after a user downloads the ebook.

example of a shared landing page for a co-marketing campaignSource

To keep things organized within your marketing automation tool, we also suggest that you come up with a unique code for naming these co-branded pages to differentiate them from your existing ones. Not to mention, this will make it easy to locate them via internal search.

Next, you may be wondering how you should go about determining which businesses would be good partners for your business. Let’s review the answer to that question next.

How to Find the Right Co-Marketing Partners to Work With

In any co-marketing relationship, you want to make sure there is mutual benefit to working together. Check out tips in determining if a partner is a good fit here.

You can also ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Do they have a similar type of audience that my company has and wants to grow? If not, the value I would get out of promoting our content to their audience may not be worth it.
  2. How many new leads am I going to get from this partnership? Is it large enough to be worth my time? Only you can decide what is worth it.
  3. Do they have some expertise that I don’t have? Let’s say my audience is dying to know more about how to optimize for local SEO, but my knowledge base is limited to general SEO knowledge. Maybe I partner with an expert on local SEO.
  4. Does their brand and name have a good reputation? Don’t partner with people who will bring down your credibility.
  5. Are the people you are working with enjoyable to work with? Sure, co-marketing is a job, but it should still be enjoyable. Look for partners that you actually look forward to working with.

How to Plan a Co-Marketing Agreement

You’ve found a partner to work with — that’s great! But, what’s the next step?

1. Come up with an idea to pitch.

Once you determine you’d like to work with a partner, it’s time to come up with an idea to pitch. When approaching this step, do your homework first. Learn what you can about the company and their audience, tailor your ideas to what would be appealing to them, and show them the value you’re going to provide.

Odds are, if you are the one pitching the idea, you are the small fish and they are the big fish. In other words, it’d be easy for them to say no in this scenario. To combat this, go the extra mile to show them that they’d be crazy not to work with you.

If you are on the other end of the pitch, remain open to ideas. Even if the person pitching you isn’t a pro, don’t disregard the opportunity immediately. If it’s a totally unrealistic partnership, be honest with them. And if the idea sounds interesting but it’s just not a great time for you to take on the project, consider adding them to a backlog of potential partners you’d want to work with in the future.

2. Make your goals clear.

If you want leads, make sure your partner knows that. Make sure they also want leads, too. If your goals are misaligned, neither of you will get value you had hoped and planned for out of the relationship.

3. Agree on the content you’ll share and promote.

Next, agree on the type of content you’ll share and promote among your audience. This includes the topic and theme of the content. Decide on a topic that is going to be mutually beneficial and appeal to both audiences.

4. Determine your timeline.

Set a timeline for your co-marketing campaign. This way, everyone is on the same page and gets their portion of the work done on time.

Pro Tip: For a larger project, like an ebook or webinar, double the amount of time it takes your team to write a campaign on your own. This will allow for time for approvals and feedback among your team members and your partner’s team members.

5. Decide what your strong skills are.

Between the your business and your partner’s, it’s likely you both have specific strengths and bring different things to the table. So, assign tasks and work accordingly.

Simply, if you assign tasks related to your co-marketing content and/or campaign based on which partner is better at what, the process will be streamlined and efficient (and likely, a lot more effective among audience members, too!).

6. Write up a formal co-marketing partnership agreement.

Like most things in business, it’s important your co-marketing partnership is solidified and official. To do this, ensure it’s in writing, in a formal agreement. With an agreement in place from the start, you have something to point back at if anything goes wrong or any miscommunications arise. (This may be a legal document or a non-legal document of good faith.)

The details of this agreement should include:

  • Topic
  • Timeline
  • Goals
  • Ownership of content and assets (who is creating what?)
  • Where the content will be hosted and shared
  • Lead-sharing agreements
  • Timeframe for promotion
  • Promotional plan
  • Reporting plan

Types of Co-Marketing Content

Time to decide what type of co-marketing project you’re going to work on. Below are a few common examples to help get the wheels turning.

Ebook

An ebook is a very common form of co-marketing content because it is easy to split up the work — someone lays out the design, someone else writes the content, and so on.

Below is an example of an ebook HubSpot created with the LinkedIn Sales Solutions team:

co-marketing example of an ebook by hubspot and linkedin

Source

Blog Post

Co-creating a blog post is one of the lower effort ways to do a co-marketing project. You may also each write a guest post for each other’s blogs. For example, here’s a guest post on the HubSpot blog.

co-marketing guest post blog post

Source

Webinar

Webinars are often the go-to type of co-marketing content. Why? Well, it’s pretty easy to find an expert who is willing to talk for an hour on the topic of their expertise. It is also a well-known format for educational materials. And they’re easy to co-host.

Below is an example of a webinar that HubSpot hosted with partner, HotJar. Users could sign up via a landing page on HubSpot’s site to attend. Now that the webinar is in the past, visitors can still download the recording at this URL.

webinar hosted by hubspot and hotjar

Source

Video

Creating a video with a partner is a great way to have your message heard by many, while also promoting both of your brands. For example, HubSpot hosted an interview video series with team members from Google, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

hubspot's a look behind the scenes campaignSource

Twitter Chat

A Twitter chat is a virtual event where people gather to discuss a common topic. This allows you to show your expertise, and invite and interact with members of both of your target audiences. Also, Twitter allows you to promote your Chat to broaden your reach even more.

Here’s a list of examples of Twitter Chats for your review.

Event (Online or Offline)

Co-marketing can also take form in larger events, both in online or in person. You and your partner may host the event together and brand the entire event in a way that depicts and shares both of your branding and marketing.

Aside from a webinar, you might host a live Q&A. For instance, maybe your business has an employee be an interviewer for the session. Meanwhile, your partner can have one of their team members be the interviewee.

For example, HubSpot’s educational series, Adapt 2020, offers a variety of content but the campaign includes live events that happen weekly. Those who choose to sign up are invited to a live, virtual event where industry experts — including HubSpot executives, HubSpot partners, and more — discuss the chosen topic of the week.

adapt 2020 campaign example of live events

Source

Once you choose the type of co-marketing content you’ll move forward with, it’s time for you and your partner to plan the execution of your campaign.

How to Execute Your Co-Marketing Campaign

There are some steps you should work through to effectively execute your co-marketing campaign with your partner.

1. Outline your co-marketing campaign.

Once you have chosen your topic and form of co-marketing, start with a shared Google Doc — brain dump, collaborate, and outline your plan here.

By using a Google Doc from the start, you your team and your partner’s team can simultaneously edit and add to the details on the Doc. In terms of timing, allow both of your teams about a week or so to hash out and finalize all ideas/ plans in this Doc.

2. Begin content creation.

Once you have agreed on the outline, assigned marketers can jump in and begin content creation. Typically, I split the creation of content between partners by having one partner write and another design, so that voice and design are consistent.

The other option is to have each partner write up and design half of the content, and then fuse the two together. Keep in mind that this will require a thorough consistency check once both parts are brought together.

After the first draft is complete, send to the partner to give feedback or approve. Give ample time between a writing due date and a feedback due date. I like to give a week if I have planned far enough in advance to allow for this.

3. Finalize your campaign content.

During the content finalization period, have your promotional team begin creating the assets needed to promote the content, such as the shared landing page as well as emails, social media images, infographics, blog posts, etc. Since working with a partner will likely take longer than a normal content creation process, this will help to save you some time.

Next, it’s time to promote your co-marketing content.

4. Promote your content.

It’s important to set an agreed upon launch date with the partner. On this date, both teams’ email, social campaigns, and blog promotion should start.

About two or three weeks prior to the launch date, have a brainstorm with all people involved from both teams to discuss what promotional tactics you will use and the timeframe for promotion. Will you both promote the same hashtag on Twitter? What audiences will you be promoting it to?

Below are a few examples of how you can promote your content across various inbound marketing channels:

Blog Posts

Blog posts are a great way to drive traffic to your co-marketing content and offers. Common places to share co-marketing blog content include daily and weekly emails to subscribers, social accounts, and mutually agreed upon areas that you can reach target audience members. For example, at HubSpot, this content may be shared via HubSpot Academy.

Social Media

Promoting your content on social media is a great way to drive awareness to your co-marketing campaign and attract visitors to your site and content.

Remember, tag your your co-marketing partner and ensure they do the same while sharing content that involves your business. This is easy to do and you’ll benefit from the cross-promotion as members of each other’s audiences will be able to view and interact with the content.

Email

Email is still one of the best ways to reach a large group of people at once — you can easily encourage recipients to attend your co-marketing webinar or event, or download your content.

In your message, be clear that the email involves your brand and your partner — your co-marketing efforts should be clear, meaning it’s obvious to all recipients that there are two companies involved.

If you’re looking to track your partner’s promotions efforts versus your own, be sure to create unique tracking URLs. This will help you determine which leads came from where. If you’re a HubSpot user, here’s how you can create unique tracking URLs.

Speaking of tracking, let’s talk more about how to measure your co-marketing efforts.

5. Measure your co-marketing campaign’s results.

Your co-marketing campaign is live and being promoted — good work! Now it’s time to look back and see if your initial efforts were successful.

First and foremost, did you hit your original goal? If so, great. If not, why? What happened? Did you fail to hit the mark, or was it the partner? Keep these things in mind when making decisions to work with them a second time.

Next, look to see if the leads generated through your co-marketing campaign were as high-quality as the leads you typically generate throughout your individual content and campaigns. Things to consider here are: lead-to-customer conversion rate, quality rating within your automation tool and CRM, and whether or not your sales team felt the leads were up to par.

Finally, take a step back and ask yourself the following questions, too:

  • Was the partnership successful, in your opinion?
  • Did your partner feel like the relationship was a helpful one for the campaign?
  • Was it difficult to work with your partner, or smooth?
  • Did you get high-quality content that you may not have been able to make without your partner?
  • What worked well while working with this partner, and what didn’t?

Once the campaign is over, your partnership doesn’t end. You should follow up with your co-marketing partner at this point.

6. Follow up with your co-marketing partner.

Communication with your partner throughout the co-marketing campaign if critical but you’ll also want to debrief once the campaign comes to an end. While it typically doesn’t make sense to do one project after another with the same partner, there may be an opportunity to work together again in the future.

And if not, it’s still important to keep a positive image for your brand and remain professional, no matter the outcome of the campaign.

For instance, imagine you hosted a campaign’s landing page on your website. Once the campaign ends, send over the leads generated from your form on that page to your partner. Often times, the easiest way to do this is to simply download the CSV file of leads from your database. If you are looking for a less manual process, you might use a tool like Zapier to send specific leads from your marketing automation platform to your partner’s.

Grow Better With Co-Marketing

There are so many ways for you and partners to benefit mutually from co-marketing. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different types of campaigns and try working with different partners. This will help you determine what works best among your audience and, therefore, benefits your business most.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in March 2013 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

19 Impressive Product Demo Videos You’ll Want to Copy

In marketing these days, you can’t swing an enthusiastic micro-influencer without hitting someone who’s talking about video content. And it’s not without merit. A recent HubSpot study revealed 54% of consumers want to see more video content from brands and businesses they support.

With video marketers earning 66% more qualified leads per year and a 54% increase in brand awareness, it’s clear video marketing is the future and product demo videos are a lucrative path forward.

In fact, 72% of people would rather use video to learn about a product or service. There are many different types of product demo videos, so I’m sharing a few of my favorites below, along with tips on how to get started on your own product demo video.

Want to skip straight to the videos? Click here.

1. Identify the goal

Purchases? Subscriptions? Education? Brand awareness? Decide what your video is trying to achieve and what you want the viewer to walk away with. What action do you hope the viewer takes after watching your video, and what business need does it fulfill? For example, “After watching our product demo video, we hope the viewer submits a demo request form.”

2. Determine your audience

Has the audience for this video purchased with you before? Are you introducing a new product or feature to them? Or is this video reaching people who have never heard of you? What will this audience be concerned with? How long will they want to watch? What buyer persona will you be gearing this video for?

All of these are important questions to answer. For example, let’s say you’re introducing software that regulates the temperature of various areas in your office. The audience for your video might be harried office managers who are constantly fielding requests to turn the temperature up or down. They’re concerned with keeping their colleagues comfortable without breaking the bank on electricity costs.

3. Set a budget (and a timeline)

Do you have $7000 or $80,000 to make this product demo video? Identify your budget so you know how to proceed. This is also the time to set expectations. If you have a $500 budget, you’re not going to come out with a video on par with Apple’s latest release — and that’s alright.

Oh, and don’t forget to outline when you need this video to be completed. Even the biggest budgets can run up against roadblocks, if the timeline is too limited.

4. Decide between in-house or agency

This decision will likely be dependent on your budget. If you have a lot to work with, interview agencies who can give you quotes and creative pitches for your project.

If you have a small budget, don’t let that dissuade you from creating a video using your iPhone. You can also record a video of your computer screen while moving through your platform. Work with what you have and be proud of whatever you create.

5. Structure your video

Will you tell a story? Highlight pain points? Use text or visuals only? Decide how you want to communicate your goal and how you’ll bring it to life.

If you’re working with a creative agency or freelance videographer, they may help you define the structure. If you’re going it alone, use videos like the ones we’ve listed below to inspire you and define which format will work best for your product and goals.

6. Choose between animation and live-action

Animation can sometimes be a little cheaper than live-action video. Work within your budget and skill level, and be honest about which option best highlights what your product can do and the scope your project requires.

7. Write a script

The script is a crucial part of your video. It defines the tone, pace, and message. Start with a project brief, move on to an outline, and navigate your script, section by section, making sure it speaks to the goals you’ve previously outlined.

Call out opportunities for B-roll throughout, and always conduct a verbal run-through before getting behind the camera.

For more tips and a video script template, check out this blog post and accompanying video on how to write a video script.

8. Create a marketing plan

Once you’ve shot, edited, and finalized your video, it’s time to decide how you’ll share it with your audience. YouTube, your website or campaign landing pages, and special email campaigns are all great channels for distribution.

But don’t overlook less obvious opportunities, like including your video in your email signature, sharing it in partner blog posts, and incorporating it into your sales team’s pitches.

Product Demo Video Examples

1. Beauty Bakerie

This pleasant demo from Beauty Bakerie‘s CEO and Co-Founder Cashmere Nicole Carillo highlights the brand’s new concealer, foundation and makeup setting mist. Cashmere begins the demo with no makeup on to show her fans what the makeup will look like realistically as she puts it on her face. 

While the demo allows viewers to see what the products will look like in real life, Cashmere also gives instructions on how to use it so they’ll also know just how easy it is to add to their daily beauty routine.

 

 

2. Airtable

This classic product demo video uses animation and the Airtable product to show users exactly who can use their product and how they can benefit from it. The video demonstrates several different use cases, taking a broad, top-of-the-funnel approach that will attract the masses.

They also do something else incredibly smart. As seconds tick by and viewers hypothetically click out of the video, the information shared gets more into the weeds sharing specific tactics and features. Airtable knows if someone has stuck around over one minute into their demo video, this is likely a qualified lead who wants to learn more.

3. Zendesk Sunshine

Zendesk leads with pain points in their product demo video. “Customer relationships are complicated … made up of fragmented pieces of what you know about your customers … it’s kind of all over the place,” a narrator explains. But Zendesk gets it. “What seems like chaos is actually everything you want.”

The viewer immediately feels like Zendesk understands them. It’s a full 50 seconds into the video before Zendesk even introduces a solution. We never actually see the platform at work, but that’s not really the goal of this video.

4. SurveyMonkey

At nearly two-minutes long, this is a lengthy product demo video. But it packs a powerful punch with text-based benefits and features, and a walk-through of the product interface.

Viewers see just how easy it is to send a survey using SurveyMonkey. They even see how it integrates with other platforms like Slack. This is a workhorse of a demo video, but the viewer witnesses how SurveyMonkey can integrate into their daily workflow — and how easy the product is to use, from sign-in to send.

5. Headspace

Is there anything harder to sell on the internet than meditation? Headspace makes it seem easy with their modern, relatable animated product demo video.

They offer a “healthier, happier life” and show you how the app works for a variety of users with differing goals and time. It’s an inclusive video that communicates a lot without overwhelming the viewer.

6. Esusu Financial

Esusu, an app created by Forbes 30 Under 30 social entrepreneurs Abbey Wemimo and Samir Goel, aims to help people in marginalized locations with financial planning. The demo created by the company gives viewers a look inside Esusu;s platform and the tools it has to offer. 

Specifically, this demo walks through how families can use the platform together to build each member’s credit, save funds together, or send funds to each other.

One great thing about the intro above is that it establishes a pain point by asking the audience if they’ve ever dealt with bad credit or poor savings. Then, it highlights exactly how Esusu can help them.

This demo is also a great example of how a quick and simple tour of an app can show potential users exactly what they need to know about navigating and using this type of financial planning app.

 

 

7. Apple’s iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR

This glossy product video introduces the new iPhone XR by showing what it can do. Simple text alerts the viewer to the features this new phone possesses (e.g., “liquid retina,” “face ID,” and “water resistant”), and the benefits are communicated through the vivid visuals.

The goal of this product demo is to “wow” rather than educate, and that’s exactly what it does.

 

 

8. Slack

Slack uses this brightly hued video to break down a common misconception about their platform: that it’s only for sending private messages. They walk viewers through how teams can communicate using their interface.

“It’s way more than just a place to talk,” explains the actor, “We keep all of our files here too.” The video is feature-heavy, but the actor chimes in with how those features translate into benefits as he walks viewers through a demonstration of Slack. A simple “Get started with Slack, today” closes out this informative video.

9. The Origins of Nike Free

This product demo tells the origin story of the Nike Free running shoes. The shoe creators share a bit about how the shoe was designed and call out benefits like, “More natural movement” and “Nice, modern evolution.” A simple tagline at the end reads, “Engineered for modern motion.”

 

 

10. Duolingo

Duolingo kicks things off with social proof. “Far and away the best free language-learning app,” says The Wall Street Journal. What follows is a description of how the platform works, backed with more data on how effective it really is.

If you want to prove that your product works, sometimes facts are more alluring than a demo of the product itself.

11. IKEA Place

There’s nothing wrong with stating your purpose up front. “Hey, IKEA would like everyone to know about Place, our new augmented reality app,” explains this demo video. What follows is a demonstration of the app, and a video montage of people struggling to design and furnish new spaces. “We want to make it easier for people everywhere to imagine a better place,” the narrator explains. That’s exactly what this video demo does.

12. NoseFrida

Your baby is cute, until she’s not. The narrator explains what happens to a baby’s nose when they’re sick — and why your baby gets fussy. Immediately, he’s identified the viewer’s pain points and explained the problem with NoseFrida’s competitors.

The narrator begins to explain how to use the NoseFrida — a device that allows parents to physically suck snot out of their baby’s nose and effectively ruins your days of carefree milkshake sipping forever (take it from me).

It’s here that the company does something brilliant. They know their customer’s biggest purchasing block is the gross-out factor this product elicits, so they confront it head on. “Breathe easy, we know what you’re thinking.”

The narrator then explains how NoseFrida is designed to be hygienic and safe. Know your product has a big red flag for customers? Try addressing it bravely, like NoseFrida does, instead of tip-toeing around the elephant in the room.

13. Bluprint

How do you get people to part with their most valuable asset: their free time? Online learning platform Bluprint does just that. They overcome viewer objections early on. Think you don’t have time? “There’s always a way to get your creative fix,” the narrator explains.

The video takes an aspirational lens, showing people cooking, painting, and dancing. It ends with a call to action, “What will you do today?” Bluprint knows what they’re up against, and their demo video is a strong rebuttal against inactivity.

14. Sphero

Are you known for one product but want to introduce another? Sphero knows a little about that. A few years ago, they created a robot called BB-8 for a little-known movie called Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Lucky for them, I hear that panned out.

In a Kickstarter video for their newest robot, they begin by featuring the iconic BB-8 robot that skyrocketed their success. Once the viewer knows who they are, they present their new robot: The Sphero RVR.

The rest of the video features the robot’s engineers speaking about what their new creation does and why it’s special. We believe them, because they’ve tethered this new creation to their past authority.

15. Ring Door View Cam

This is another great example of showing instead of telling viewers what your product can do. The video shows everyday people using Ring’s Door View Cam in a variety of ways. We see them use the mobile interface, benefit from the speaker, and avoid danger using the camera.

16. Lime

Text that reads, “How to Lime” kicks this video off and tells viewers exactly what to expect. We see a step-by-step demonstration of how to use Lime, their safety recommendations, and some basics on their mobile app.

17. Peloton

This product video begins with an origin story of the Peloton bicycle and quickly moves to the benefits (i.e., you can ride it in your bedroom without waking your partner). Before you know it, the video is speaking to viewer pain points, “One of the challenges with boutique fitness is that it can be inconvenient.” They solution? Peloton.

Thousands of classes, experienced instructors, community, and ease of use. Close-ups of the machine in use highlights certain features, but what this video demonstrates most is the experience you’ll have using Peloton. “This is what I’ve been missing,” says one video participant. I can’t help but think that’s the primary goal the makers of this video had for their viewers.

18. Zoom

This is a classic example of a product demo video. A solid, feature-heavy script immediately jumps into how professionals can use and benefit from Zoom. The viewer sees the product being used as they listen to how it works, and they’re left with a clear picture of what Zoom can offer them.

19. Gusto

I’ve saved the most comprehensive product demo video for last. This example, from HR software provider Gusto, clocks in at an impressive five minutes and fifty-six seconds.

What follows is a careful walk-through of the product, it’s benefits, and how to pick the perfect plan.

Viewers who make it to the end likely signal to Gusto that they’re ready to speak with a salesperson. This video probably works best for buyers further along in the buyer’s journey. If your goal is to introduce your product/service to new audiences, stick with a shorter option that’s quick and easy to consume.

Using Product Demo Videos in Your Marketing Strategy

Product demo videos might take a bit of time and planning to create, but once they’re live, they can be an effective piece of your brand’s overall video marketing strategy.

As 2020 continues, and consumer seek out more video content while researching products, marketers are also finding that videos are their most effective asset. Like them, you’ll want to leverage video marketing and product demos to guide your prospect to the customer stage.

Want to create your own video? Check out our ultimate guide to video marketing.

Editor’s Note: This blog post was originally published in June 2019, but was updated for comprehensiveness and freshness in July 2020.

 

How Brands Like Google, Twitch, and Sephora Built Brand Communities — and How You Can, Too

Over the past few decades, companies, marketing departments, and c-suites have used the term “community” to refer to a smorgasbord of ideas, from wide-ranging organizational investments — such as neighborhood events or charity partnerships — to online forums and even simple email lists.

These ideas aim to create some sense of the collective belonging people used to feel, long before our now-record isolation and loneliness. But most (and sometimes all) of these community-building measures are superficial, or even irrelevant, to what constitutes real community.

We call the resulting so-called communities mirage communities: groups that organizations may label as communities, but that a trained eye can recognize are not.

There are, however, a growing number of organizations that take the need for community far more seriously. These organizations invest in effective community principles, and they’re rewarded with breakthrough innovation, critical feedback, brand loyalty, and employee retention.

But these rewards don’t appear magically. They require a special investment.

So, how do some of today’s most successful companies do it? Let’s explore how Google, Twitch, and Sephora implement authentic community-building strategies, and how your own company can, too.

1. Google invests in Labs.

At Google, community success comes in the form of collaborative groups, or what Google calls “Labs.”

Each Google Lab brings together approximately 100 thought leaders, in specific industries, to tackle some of today’s most pressing issues. Google Labs foster mutual respect and concern among members, which spawn conversations, collaborations, and opportunities that were never possible before. It’s part of what keeps Google at the top of every “most innovative” company list today.

For example, Google’s Food Lab focuses on the production, purchase, and presentation of food. Its members take on top food challenges, from “How do we move our culture to a plant-forward diet?” to “How do we eliminate waste in our food system?”

In turn, Google is lauded as a brand that inspires the food industry, while it refines (and reduces) its own monstrous spending on healthy employee food perks — which, at one point, cost nearly $72 million a year at the main office “Googleplex” alone.

2. Twitch succeeds with local groups.

Twitch attracts over 2 million people per month to watch and livestream digital video broadcasts. Their approach is built on a two-sided marketplace: they need to attract broadcasters, as well as audience members. Local community groups help them succeed.

Twitch has built a worldwide team to support over 40 local, city-based groups, each of which hosts real-life and virtual events that foster genuine friendships and deep relationships between local Twitch members. However, local groups (and their leaders) must demonstrate how well they can bring members together, first.

These local groups allow Twitch to transform online interactions — which can often feel transactional — into connections that have real meaning. Members return again and again to the brand, and recruit others to participate, because Twitch is a space where authentic emotional investments happen.

3. Sephora says “yes” to beauty enthusiasts.

Sephora — one of the largest beauty retailers in the world — has invested in building a makeup enthusiast community that is both accessible on mobile devices and integrated into the shopping experience.

Inside the community, members can discuss a variety of beauty products and methods, regardless of whether they’re related to Sephora products or not. Within the community, Sephora enables members to follow interesting topics and connect with fellow members, keep up with trends and chat with brands, and score access to exclusive events.

Community members can also gain access to beauty techniques and product information, engage with beauty company founders, and experience an affirming space with others who love the fun, play, and transformation of makeup.

What do these examples have in common?

Real communities are made up of relationships. Always. Relationships exist in the realm of personal experience, and although they may include transactions, they are never purely transactional. They also include some generosity — at least the kind where we help others without calculating the return on investment (ROI) for sending a card, answering a timely question, or holding a door open for a stranger coming in from the cold.

To build an effective brand community, you must reject the premise that everything an organization does or offers must generate profit or exist within a transaction. Instead, community-building efforts will help consumers see more long-term value in your brand.

People don’t commit to, feel safe in, or extend themselves for relationships that only serve a person (or brand) “getting” something as cheaply and easily as possible. We commit to relationships in which we believe that others care about our success, too.

In a real community, members help one another become who they want to be. This can include sharing information, skills, hard-won lessons, and — very often — attentive friendship. When a brand can offer this to members (e.g., customers, users, staff, colleagues, or volunteers), something much richer and more rewarding can develop.

Three Tips for Building True Community

  1. Go beyond the transaction. Make sure you go far beyond building transactional relationships. It’s not enough to offer coupons or simply invite someone to a virtual or in-person event.
  2. Define how you’re helping members. Articulate exactly how you’re enriching the lives of community members — help them, not just your corporate goals.
  3. Think small. Community happens in small experiences. Intentionally create what we call “campfire experiences,” which are intimate experiences where participants have proximity, permission, and time to connect with a small group.

Everything You Need to Know About Affiliate Marketing

If you’ve ever came across Tim Ferris’s iconic book on how to just work four hours per week, you’ve probably dreamed of sipping a Mojito on a beach while your money worked for you in the background. One of the main ideas he constantly talks about is the concept of passive income.

After all, having an income chart like this is the main goal of many online entrepreneurs:

passive income goal sample chart

For many entrepreneurs looking to build an online business or marketers looking to monetize their web traffic, affiliate marketing is often how they got started with generating income.

Affiliate marketing is one of the world’s most popular methods of generating passive income online, and it continues to grow. In fact, affiliate marketing spend is reported to increase to $8.2 billion by 2022 — up from $5.4 billion in 2017.

If you’re looking for a complete guide to affiliate marketing, read more to find out how you can promote products as an affiliate to create an additional source of income.

There are typically four parties involved in affiliate marketing:

  • Affiliates: The promoters of the product
  • Product creators: The creators of the product
  • Networks: The networks managing the affiliates
  • Consumers: The end users of the product

affiliate marketing model

Image Source

You don’t always need a network to become an affiliate, but the other three parties (the affiliates, the product creators, and the consumers) form the core of an affiliate program.

Who are the affiliates?

An affiliate, also known as a publisher, can be an individual or a company. Typically, these are other bloggers or content creators operating in the industry of the product they are creating.

They help promote the product or service by creating content like blog posts, videos, or other media.

They can also promote their content to get transactions by putting up ads, capturing search traffic from SEO, or building an email list.

When one of their visitors creates a transaction, which could be a purchase or submitting a lead form, the affiliate gets a commission. How much commission is structured depends on the affiliate program terms.

Who are the merchants?

A merchant, also known as the product creator or advertiser, is typically the creator of the product or services. They offer revenue sharing and commissions to people or other companies (affiliates), which have a significant following on their brand.

The merchant can be a company like HubSpot, which offers a commission to every affiliate who’s able to get their visitors to make a purchase.

Or it can be an individual like Pat Flynn, who offers an affiliate program with his podcasts.

The merchants can be anyone from a solopreneur to a big company, as long as they are willing to pay their affiliates to help them gain a transaction.

Sometimes the merchant does not even have to be the product creator, as in the case of the Amazon Associates Program.

Who are the affiliate networks?

An affiliate network acts as an intermediary between the merchants and their affiliates. In some cases, a network is not necessary, but some companies choose to work with a network to add a layer of trust.

The network manages the relationship and provides third-party checks and balances. Third-party checks can be important because they bring down fraud rates.

Some popular networks include ClickBank and ShareASale.

Some merchants choose to work with an affiliate network because they lack the time or resources to track, report, and manage payments to the affiliates. They might also choose to work with multiple affiliates or publishers within the affiliate network.

Who are the consumers?

The consumers or customers are the ones who makes the transaction. They are the ones who purchase the product or submit the lead form in order for the affiliate to gain the commission.

We’ll talk more about getting paid in the next section. In the meantime, here are some common affiliate marketing models:

Pay-Per-Click (PPC): The affiliate gets paid for all clicks that were generated, regardless of whether a lead or sale happened. This is fairly rare since all the risk is on the product creator.

Pay-Per-Lead (PPL): The affiliate gets paid for every lead they generated. This could be an online form submission, trial creation, or any pre-purchase. This is a shared risk on both the merchant and the affiliate.

Pay-Per-Sale (PPS): The affiliate gets paid for every sale they generated. This is the most common model since all the risk is on the affiliate.

Now, let’s talk about how to get started with affiliate marketing.

When it comes to affiliate marketing, most people think it’s a process of earning a commission by promoting other people’s or company’s products.

While affiliate marketing can seem straightforward — just find a product you love, promote it, and earn a piece of profit with every sale you make — there are actually a few moving parts you need to a monitor.

1. Choose a platform and niche.

To be an affiliate, you need to have influence. Establishing a website or blog that specializes in a niche is the best way to establish influence. Whether you focus on finance, personal health, business, or even cats, a niched blog or website will help you gain influence and build an audience.

Affiliate marketers build audiences through blogs (on WordPress or HubSpot), via newsletters, or even on YouTube or other social media channels.

2. Build an audience.

A large, engaged audience is a highly valuable asset for any blog or website. Having people who read, view, and engage with your content can help you make affiliate income.

The best way to build an audience is to first establish who your target audience is, and you can find your target audience by researching competitors, monitoring your traffic, and conducting first-hand research by talking to subscribers and customers.

Once you establish this group, grow and cultivate your loyal online audience through targeted content and emails. Give your audience a reason to read and engage with your content, and they’ll find a reason to purchase your recommended products, too.

3. Sign up for an affiliate program.

The best way to get started with affiliate marketing is by signing up for an affiliate program like the Amazon Associates or HubSpot Affiliate Program. After signing up, you will get an affiliate link that contains a unique ID. You can then use this link in your content.

There are typically no upfront costs when it comes to joining an affiliate program, but your variable ongoing costs will depend on how you want to promote the products. If you choose to outsource content or run ads, those are costs that will come out of your pocket.

4. Choose which products to promote.

Choosing the right product to promote, working with the right company, fostering relationships, and updating content are all core essentials of excelling at affiliate marketing.

According to Pat Flynn, one of the pioneers of creating passive income through providing value to his audience, there are two important rules when it comes to affiliate marketing:

  • Only recommend products as an affiliate that you’re extremely very familiar with. If you are not confident in the product and do not feel it will help people, do not promote it.
  • Never tell anyone to directly buy a product. Always recommend products based on your experience and in the context of what you’ve done.

When it comes to choosing the right products, David Gonzalez — founder of an affiliate management agency, suggests that you should think about these three components when choosing a product to promote:

  1. Your audience: Will the product resonate with them and make them grateful you promoted it?
  2. Product quality & value: Would you advocate your best friend buying it?
  3. Profitability: Does the offer have highly competitive conversions & payouts?

After reading these recommendations, do any products come to mind?

5. Create remarkable content that promotes your affiliate products.

To see the best success with affiliate marketing, you need to create genuine and remarkable content that promotes your chosen products. Write a round-up blog post of your favorite products. Create comparison charts that discuss the merits of similar products. Interview other users and fans of the products to showcase different opinions.

Regardless of what kind of content you create, ensure it features authentic reviews and mentions of your affiliate products. Avoid discussing and promoting products you haven’t used yourself.

6. Optimize and track.

Whenever your visitor clicks on your unique affiliate link, a cookie is inserted in their browser to track actions.

When they make a transaction that is a qualified action (could be a sale or lead form submission, depending on the terms of the program), the merchant is able to record this action and attribute it to you as an affiliate so they can make a payout.

You should track your own affiliate content, too, to see what has performed well and what you can improve and promote. Understanding what content resonates best with your audience will show you what to focus on for future affiliate marketing opportunities.

7. Get paid.

There are different structures when it comes to payout, which varies based on affiliate program terms.

Commission payouts by the company are usually given on a monthly basis, but this varies depending on the affiliate program terms.

It could be a weekly payout or a monthly payment for all the leads or sales you’ve made.

You’ll want to pay attention to the payout structure when choosing an affiliate program to join, which ultimately depends on the goals you have.

You might want to understand the commission structure of the company or product creator. Are you looking for a commission per sale or commission per lead generated? Are you looking at a recurring commission or a one-off payment?

Depending on your goals, this will affect which product you choose, how you plan to promote the product as well as how much time & resources you want to invest.

For instance, if you choose to promote your content via paid ads, then that’s a cost you have to account for. You will have to compare how much you’ve spent to promote each piece of content or to generate each purchase against how much commission you’re getting for each referred sale.

Or, if you have a blog and website, then you will have to pay for hosting. In this case, this should be a flat fee spread out across all your referred sale.

Use this marketing plan generator to calculate how much you need to invest to get a basic marketing plan up and running.

How much can you make from affiliate programs?

You might be wondering, what are established affiliates earnings? (established affiliates are those working full-time.) Well, that varies. I’ve seen super affiliates earn upwards of $100,000 per month.

Making money from an affiliate program is more about the profits than the revenue you’re getting.

An affiliate making $5000/day might be worse off than another affiliate making $500/day with no cash outflow because the former might be spending most of his revenue on paid acquisition.

At the end of the day, before becoming an affiliate, you have to align your expectations to your earning potential. What kind of industry or niche you operate in, and what kind of work you do depends a lot on how much you want to make.

If you focus on ads like Adwords or Facebook to promote your affiliate products, how much money you invest is as important (if not more) as how much you make.

Are you ready to start affiliate marketing?

I commonly hear one misconception: affiliate marketing is dead.

It seems like every year in the world of online marketing, people have mentioned some variant of X is dead — SEO, email, mobile, etc.

The test of time is a pretty good test — if something has stayed around for a while, there’s a better chance of it sticking around for a while.

Everything evolves, and there are tactics that don’t work the exact same way as they did before. Affiliate marketing, of course, is no exception to that rule.

Affiliate marketing has evolved from a get-rich-quick scheme into something that requires affiliate to build real trust with their audience in order to reap the rewards of the work that’s been put in.

At the end of the day, become successful at affiliate marketing requires you to nail down the fundamentals of marketing. Authenticity is hard to fake, especially when it comes to building your own personal brand.

A brand that promotes products incessantly without any regard for bring real value to its audience will find affiliate marketing to be a short-lived source of income. Choosing the right products to promote, stemming from a true passion for what the product does, forms the basis of all your promotional activities.

While there are many tactics to scale your promotion, the golden rule of affiliate marketing stays the same: only promote products you love & treat your audience like humans.

Build your own brand, choose products that you love, create authentic content and you will be on your way to building a real source of passive income.

Editor’s note: This post was originally published in December 2018 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.

How Brands Like Google, Twitch, and Sephora Built Brand Communities — and How You Can, Too

Over the past few decades, companies, marketing departments, and c-suites have used the term “community” to refer to a smorgasbord of ideas, from wide-ranging organizational investments — such as neighborhood events or charity partnerships — to online forums and even simple email lists.

These ideas aim to create some sense of the collective belonging people used to feel, long before our now-record isolation and loneliness. But most (and sometimes all) of these community-building measures are superficial, or even irrelevant, to what constitutes real community.

We call the resulting so-called communities mirage communities: groups that organizations may label as communities, but that a trained eye can recognize are not.

There are, however, a growing number of organizations that take the need for community far more seriously. These organizations invest in effective community principles, and they’re rewarded with breakthrough innovation, critical feedback, brand loyalty, and employee retention.

But these rewards don’t appear magically. They require a special investment.

So, how do some of today’s most successful companies do it? Let’s explore how Google, Twitch, and Sephora implement authentic community-building strategies, and how your own company can, too.

1. Google invests in Labs.

At Google, community success comes in the form of collaborative groups, or what Google calls “Labs.”

Each Google Lab brings together approximately 100 thought leaders, in specific industries, to tackle some of today’s most pressing issues. Google Labs foster mutual respect and concern among members, which spawn conversations, collaborations, and opportunities that were never possible before. It’s part of what keeps Google at the top of every “most innovative” company list today.

For example, Google’s Food Lab focuses on the production, purchase, and presentation of food. Its members take on top food challenges, from “How do we move our culture to a plant-forward diet?” to “How do we eliminate waste in our food system?”

In turn, Google is lauded as a brand that inspires the food industry, while it refines (and reduces) its own monstrous spending on healthy employee food perks — which, at one point, cost nearly $72 million a year at the main office “Googleplex” alone.

2. Twitch succeeds with local groups.

Twitch attracts over 2 million people per month to watch and livestream digital video broadcasts. Their approach is built on a two-sided marketplace: they need to attract broadcasters, as well as audience members. Local community groups help them succeed.

Twitch has built a worldwide team to support over 40 local, city-based groups, each of which hosts real-life and virtual events that foster genuine friendships and deep relationships between local Twitch members. However, local groups (and their leaders) must demonstrate how well they can bring members together, first.

These local groups allow Twitch to transform online interactions — which can often feel transactional — into connections that have real meaning. Members return again and again to the brand, and recruit others to participate, because Twitch is a space where authentic emotional investments happen.

3. Sephora says “yes” to beauty enthusiasts.

Sephora — one of the largest beauty retailers in the world — has invested in building a makeup enthusiast community that is both accessible on mobile devices and integrated into the shopping experience.

Inside the community, members can discuss a variety of beauty products and methods, regardless of whether they’re related to Sephora products or not. Within the community, Sephora enables members to follow interesting topics and connect with fellow members, keep up with trends and chat with brands, and score access to exclusive events.

Community members can also gain access to beauty techniques and product information, engage with beauty company founders, and experience an affirming space with others who love the fun, play, and transformation of makeup.

What do these examples have in common?

Real communities are made up of relationships. Always. Relationships exist in the realm of personal experience, and although they may include transactions, they are never purely transactional. They also include some generosity — at least the kind where we help others without calculating the return on investment (ROI) for sending a card, answering a timely question, or holding a door open for a stranger coming in from the cold.

To build an effective brand community, you must reject the premise that everything an organization does or offers must generate profit or exist within a transaction. Instead, community-building efforts will help consumers see more long-term value in your brand.

People don’t commit to, feel safe in, or extend themselves for relationships that only serve a person (or brand) “getting” something as cheaply and easily as possible. We commit to relationships in which we believe that others care about our success, too.

In a real community, members help one another become who they want to be. This can include sharing information, skills, hard-won lessons, and — very often — attentive friendship. When a brand can offer this to members (e.g., customers, users, staff, colleagues, or volunteers), something much richer and more rewarding can develop.

Three Tips for Building True Community

  1. Go beyond the transaction. Make sure you go far beyond building transactional relationships. It’s not enough to offer coupons or simply invite someone to a virtual or in-person event.
  2. Define how you’re helping members. Articulate exactly how you’re enriching the lives of community members — help them, not just your corporate goals.
  3. Think small. Community happens in small experiences. Intentionally create what we call “campfire experiences,” which are intimate experiences where participants have proximity, permission, and time to connect with a small group.

How to Repurpose Audio and Video Content for Social Media: 5 Ways

Looking for ways to create useful social media content from your videos, live video, and podcasts? Wondering how to easily transform that content for social media? In this article, you’ll discover how to repurpose video and audio into multiple formats you can share on your social media channels. Have Your Tech in Place Creating content […]

The post How to Repurpose Audio and Video Content for Social Media: 5 Ways appeared first on Social Media Examiner | Social Media Marketing.

from Social Media Examiner | Social Media Marketing https://ift.tt/2EQ3fIz
via socialmediaexaminer

Reach and Delight (The Right) Customers with Cooperative Marketing

Let’s say you’re buying a new phone. You probably also have to buy a screen protector and case. But, never fear — The phone store has an array of both from different companies. They are bundled with the phone for a lower price.

A phone store that bundles their products with complementary ones is an example of cooperative marketing. This offer takes advantage of products you’d already need to invest in when buying a phone, and uses that to entice you into purchasing.

That way, instead of spending time and money to make a campaign about the phones a screen protector is great for, the cooperative partnership drives leads and sales in a more organic way.

Whether the partnership is with direct competitors or complementary ones, all can enjoy the exposure and business a cooperative marketing campaigns offer.

Now that you have a pretty good idea of how cooperative marketing works, let’s look at some examples from companies that have excelled with their campaigns. This strategy leaves plenty of room for experimentation — some can even leverage it as part of their business model. 

Let’s dive in, below. 

Cooperative Marketing Examples

Cooperative marketing can show up in many different business types. You’ve most likely seen cooperative marketing in action around you. Let’s take a look at examples from other companies for tactics you can use in your own campaign planning.

1. Cafe Integral + Freehand Hotel

Freehand Hotel is an independent hotel chain with locations in New York City and Chicago. It promotes business travel in swanky, upscale surroundings. Freehand’s locations have a coffee shop built in from local chain Cafe Integral.

The Freehand website has a page about the coffee shop showing customers the benefits of having a roastery in the lobby of their space:

Freehand Hotel's website featuring Cafe Integral.

Image Source

Travelers who need a morning pick-me-up, can enjoy a quick drink from their hotel. They wouldn’t have to hop in the rental car for an espresso or walk to the nearest latte. And, if guests have vouchers for a free meal or drink, they’re getting coffee included in their room fee.

If Freehand Hotel guests love the drinks from Cafe Integral, they can visit the standalone in Lower Manhattan, New York, earning the location more loyal customers.

2. Snarls + The Sonder Bombs Split

A split is a common music industry term to describe two acts coming together on the same release. Audiences can enjoy original and cover versions of each artist’s music. They’re a great way to discover new music and give musicians new ways to promote their work.

This split is from label-mates The Sonder Bombs and Snarls, and it offers two original songs from each band and two covers of the other’s most popular tunes:

The product page for the Snarls and Sonder Bombs split.

Image Source

For one price, audiences get two bands and a chance to hear them play new, exclusive versions of old favorites. They can also hear professional covers from another band that might become their new favorite.

3. Vegancuts Snack Box

Subscription boxes are another example of cooperative marketing in action. Instead of buying individual products at once, consumers are able to pay one price for a bundle. This allows for the marketing messaging to focus on the value of product discovery.

Example of a snackbox from Vegancuts.

Image Source

The Vegancuts Snack Box, for example, lets you try snacks from multiple different brands. Usually, there’s a variety, like cookies, chips, and candy. While not necessarily a marketing campaign, subscription box companies like this one can capitalize using their business model as a cooperative marketing tactic.

4. Streaming Service Bundle

Disney+, a popular streaming service, offers a bundle for customers. For a few dollars more than the standalone subscription price, customers can have access to Hulu and ESPN. That way, customers can have movies, sports, and shows for one price.

Disney+ bundled services offer.

Image Source

Disney’s marketers bundling the services invites fans from diverse ages and interests to sign up for the service. Disney is family-friendly, Hulu has original shows and movies, and ESPN is all about sports. Each company can enjoy new subscribers and cross-promotional content from Disney as a result.

5. Sony + Naughty Dog Games

It’s not uncommon for new video game consoles to come with a copy of a popular game so players can learn the controls. For Sony’s PlayStation 4 release, the pack-in game was Naughty Dog’s Uncharted 4. This was a great cooperative marketing opportunity between a video game console and a game development company.

The PS4 bundle with Uncharted 4.

Image Source

Uncharted 4 coming with every new PS4 being sold meant that Naughty Dog’s game was being exposed to millions of players. That’s an incredible reach, one that the game company would probably struggle to do on their own.

Fans got to experience a new game to play with their new console, Sony got to sweeten the console offering, and Naughty Dog earned more leads, making this partnership a home run.

6. HubSpot Webinar

As part of Adapt 2020, an educational webinar series, “Advertising in a Time of Crisis” is a conversation between one of HubSpot’s general project managers, Google Canada‘s head of marketing, a Facebook IQ lead marketer, and the Director of Paid Media at Wunderman Thompson.

The stream for Adapt 2020's advertising discussion.These minds came together to discuss how companies should be advertising, how to shift the messaging of targeted ad campaigns, and how to measure the success of those campaigns. This webinar is completely free, and gives B2B audiences excellent insights about timely subjects from industry thought leaders.

This offering gives all companies involved a more broad reach. A collaboration, like this webinar, is a great idea when thinking about ways to cooperatively market on a budget.

Are you thinking of adding cooperative marketing products or strategies to your next rollout? When thinking of the right route to take, don’t forget to factor in your business goals and audience.

From there, you can make a decision based on the benefit of all parties — partnerships included. If you’re part of a small business that doesn’t have many resources to spare, a cooperative strategy could be an incredible way to expand your network and share resources to generate more business.

How Often Should You (or Your Company) Blog? [New Data]

Starting a blog is tough. Thinking about what to post and how to promote it requires strategic planning. And will your content resonate with and delight your customers?

We haven’t even covered how often companies should post — a factor that can make or break even the greatest of content.

You might be surprised to know that even though there’s a surplus of hard data about why blog posts are integral to marketing, there’s not much on the frequency of posting. This is because, well, it depends.

If ambiguity gets your heart racing, fear not. Here, we’ll offer suggestions and stats to help inform your decision.

If you’re a marketing team of one, don’t feel the need to constantly pump out content. If you do, you’ll probably find yourself getting burned out and releasing content that’s not beneficial to you or your audience.

Keeping a schedule when blogging is important for two reasons. First, it builds organic traffic. Next, it helps with brand awareness. We’ll get into why below.

Organic traffic

Blogging is important for SEO if you want to increase visits to your website. But, if you are already posting valuable content, it might benefit you to go back and update that content, especially if after a little while, you want to give certain posts a boost.

Blog post traffic is compounding, which means it gains organic results over time. This is why updating posts are important. This gives you more reads, more recognition, and possibly, more fans.

 

Brand awareness

Because Google can crawl every page of a website for SEO, every blog post you make has the chance to enhance not only optimization but awareness of your brand. For example, if you’re in the beauty industry and you publish high-quality posts about how to apply eyeliner or mascara, you have the opportunity to be seen in those Google search results.

To build brand loyalty, make sure you’re producing high-quality content. If you’re producing content with images, keywords, and industry-relevant content, you can increase your brand awareness.

So, blogging is still of high importance for brand discovery and building leads. If you’re trying to figure out the right publishing frequency for your team and your business, keep reading.

Blogging Frequency

Blogging frequency ultimately depends on what you aim to accomplish with your blog. So, let’s look at the basics of how often you should blog for what you aim to accomplish.

Organic traffic

If your main goal is to raise traffic numbers and bring clicks to your website and content, you want to post frequently. It’s ultimately up to you to determine what that schedule looks like.

As a small blog with a limited team, it can be difficult to brainstorm, create, and promote a new post every day. This is where planning comes in handy. When you’re coordinating your next product launch campaign, plan for blog posts in tandem, and set aside time to outline those posts.

Having the material outlined and organized before you begin writing saves you time. Because you want to publish as much as possible, think of content that will educate your readers. This can look different depending on the blog, but some blog ideas include industry how-tos, campaign round-ups, and listicles.

For more blog post ideas, check out this list of 101 ideas HubSpotters put together.

Brand awareness

When you’re focusing on building your brand, the key is to diversify content. Try to think of the ways blog posts can highlight your brand and help to define it. How can a blog post tell your audience who you are?

Because your focus will be on building a voice for your company, these posts don’t need to be published as frequently as a traffic-building agenda would demand. Instead, smaller businesses should try to fit these in once a week or so.

Building brand awareness gives you a chance to provide useful information to your target audience. Providing branded infographics or statistics about your industry that are branded are good ways to build loyalty.

Content can vary even further, from an “Employee of the month” post celebrating your team to an event recap of a recent company outing, or an infographic that explains your core values.

Below is a graphic that summarizes some goals to shoot for when thinking about blog frequency. Remember that updating posts with new information is a great way to build SEO, no matter the goal.

how often should you blog? graphic

With proper planning in place, the volume of blogs you produce may surprise you. We chose the soft goal of three to four times a week for smaller blogs focusing on organic traffic because blogging should be a priority if boosting clicks is the goal.

In 2019, HubSpot found that marketers who prioritize marketing efforts are 13x more likely to see positive ROI. Making blogging a serious portion of your day-to-day is hard work, but rewarding in that you may garner visits and leads.

 

Larger blogs with a few team members are able to increase volume but should be wary of burnout and over-saturation of search engine results. That’s why the goal is four to five times a week. This ensures new posts have time to gain traffic and updated posts are being boosted properly to round out your campaign goals.

Because content for brand awareness is more specialized and not as focused on gaining traffic, the frequency of blog posts is not as high. We recommend smaller, brand-awareness focused blogs post one to two times a week. While they may not perform as well as researched, traffic-focused content, they give a voice and holistic medium to your blog.

For blogs with more resources, it’s easier to up the frequency of brand awareness posts, especially because large blogs probably already have a decent amount of organic traffic. There’s more room to focus on content that grows a company’s brand and provide thought leadership.

Starting a blog and keeping it consistent can be really difficult, but there’s no exact science to it. Because of this, you can be flexible with how you maintain your blog, as long as you are sticking to your business goals.

Editor’s Note: This blog post was originally published in Nov. 2019 but updated for freshness in August 2020.

26 Companies With Really Catchy Slogans & Brand Taglines

Keep it simple, stupid.

We don’t mean to offend you — this is just an example of a great slogan that also bears the truth of the power of succinctness in advertising.

It’s incredibly difficult to be succinct, and it’s especially difficult to express a complex emotional concept in just a couple of words — which is exactly what slogans and taglines do.

That’s why we have a lot of respect for the brands that have done it right. The ones that have figured out how to convey their value proposition to their buyer persona in just one, short sentence — and a quippy one, at that.

So if you’re looking to get a little slogan inspiration of your own, take a look at some of our favorite company slogans and taglines from both past and present. But before we get into specific examples, let’s quickly go over what a slogan is, how it differs from a tagline, and what makes these branded one-liners stand out.

What Is a Slogan?

In business, a slogan is “a catchphrase or small group of words that are combined in a special way to identify a product or company,” according to Entrepreneur.com’s small business encyclopedia.

In many ways, they’re like mini-mission statements.

Companies have slogans for the same reason they have logos: advertising. While logos are visual representations of a brand, slogans are audible representations of a brand. Both formats grab consumers’ attention more readily than the name a company or product might. Plus, they’re simpler to understand and remember.

The goal? To leave a key brand message in consumers’ minds so that, if they remember nothing else from an advertisement, they’ll remember the slogan.

 

What Makes a Great Slogan?

According to HowStuffWorks, a great slogan has most or all of the following characteristics:

It’s memorable.

Is the slogan quickly recognizable? Will people only have to spend a second or two thinking about it? A brief but strong few words can go a long way in advertisements, videos, posters, business cards, swag, and other places.

It includes a key benefit.

Ever heard the marketing advice, “Sell the sizzle, not the steak”? It means sell the benefits, not the features — which applies perfectly to slogans. A great slogan makes a company or product’s benefits clear to the audience.

It differentiates the brand.

Does your light beer have the fullest flavor? Or maybe the fewest calories? What is it about your product or brand that sets it apart from competitors? (Check out our essential branding guide here.)

It imparts positive feelings about the brand.

The best taglines use words that are positive and upbeat. For example, Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups’ slogan, “Two great tastes that taste great together,” gives the audience good feelings about Reese’s, whereas a slogan like Lea & Perrins’, “Steak sauce only a cow could hate,” uses negative words. The former leaves a better impression on the audience.

Now that we’ve covered what a slogan is and what makes one great, here are examples of some of the best brand slogans of all time. (Note: We’ve updated this post with several ideas folks previously shared with us in the comments.)

Slogan vs. Tagline

Although both “slogan” and “tagline” tend to be used interchangeably, they actually serve two different purposes. 

As we mentioned in Entrepreneur.com’s definition above, a slogan identifies a product or company. So does a tagline, for that matter. Where these terms differ is in how they position a company in its industry.

    • A slogan encompasses a company’s mission, what it stands for, and even how it’s helping customers in the individual campaigns the company might run. Slogans can therefore be longer than taglines, as you’ll see in the list below.
    • A tagline is a catchy quip that evokes an image of your brand in the minds of your customers. Taglines enable people to make lighthearted associations with your business: “When I see [tagline], I think [company].”

Taglines are more often next to the company’s logo on official advertisements, and are dedicated more specifically to brand awareness than slogans. Slogans carry a brand’s values and promises as the company grows and evolves, and can be promoted under an overarching company tagline.

Your organization doesn’t have to develop both a slogan and a tagline — it might succeed with just a solid, recognizable tagline. But as you develop new products and identify new types of customers, you might find your brand launching a campaign that is primed for its own slogan.

Slogans

1. Dollar Shave Club: “Shave Time. Shave Money.”

The folks at Dollar Shave Club have made their way onto quite a few of our lists here on the blog, and it’s safe to say that when it comes to marketing and advertising, this brand’s team knows what it’s doing. And its slogan — “Shave Time. Shave Money.” — is an excellent reflection of their expertise.

This little quip cleverly incorporates two of the service’s benefits: cost and convenience. It’s punny, to the point, and it perfectly represents the overall tone of the brand.

Dollar-Shave-Club-Slogan.jpg

Source: TheStephenHarvey.com

2. MasterCard: “There are some things money can’t buy. For everything else, there’s MasterCard.”

MasterCard’s two-sentence slogan was created in 1997 as a part of an award-winning advertising campaign that ran in 98 countries and in 46 languages. The very first iteration of the campaign was a TV commercial that aired in 1997: “A dad takes his son to a baseball game and pays for a hot dog and a drink, but the conversation between the two is priceless,” writes Avi Dan for Forbes.

“In a sense, ‘Priceless’ became a viral, social campaign years before there was a social media,” Dan writes. Today, “Priceless” is widely considered MasterCard’s tagline — borne out of the longer mission-focused slogan stated above.

One key to this campaign’s success? Each commercial elicits an emotional response from the audience. That first TV commercial might remind you of sports games you went to with your dad, for example. Each advertisement attempted to trigger a different memory or feeling. “You have to create a cultural phenomenon and then constantly nurture it to keep it fresh,” MasterCard CMO Raja Rajamannar told Dan. And nostalgia marketing like that can be a powerful tool.

3. M&M: “Melts in Your Mouth, Not in Your Hands”

Here’s one brand that didn’t need much time before realizing its core value proposition. At the end of the day, chocolate is chocolate. How can one piece of chocolate truly stand out from another? By bringing in the convenience factor, of course.

This particular example highlights the importance of finding something that makes your brand different from the others — in this case, the hard shell that keeps chocolate from melting all over you.

4. De Beers: “A Diamond Is Forever”

Diamonds aren’t worth much inherently. In fact, a diamond is worth at least 50% less than you paid for it the moment you left the jewelry store. So how did they become the symbol of wealth, power, and romance they are in America today? It was all because of a brilliant, multifaceted marketing strategy designed and executed by ad agency N.W. Ayer in the early 1900s for their client, De Beers.

The four, iconic words “A Diamond is Forever” have appeared in every single De Beers advertisement since 1948, and AdAge named it the best slogan of the century in 1999. It perfectly captures the sentiment De Beers was going for: that a diamond, like your relationship, is eternal. It also helped discourage people from ever reselling their diamonds. (Mass re-selling would disrupt the market and reveal the alarmingly low intrinsic value of the stones themselves.) Brilliant.

de-beers-slogan.jpg

de-beers-slogan-old.jpg

Source: Sydney Merritt

5. Meow Mix: “Tastes So Good, Cats Ask for It by Name”

Meow meow meow meow … who remembers this catchy tune sung by cats, for cats, in Meow Mix’s television commercials? The brand released a simple but telling slogan: “Tastes So Good, Cats Ask For It By Name.”

This slogan plays off the fact that every time a cat meows, s/he is actually asking for Meow Mix. It was not only clever, but it also successfully planted Meow Mix as a standout brand in a cluttered market.

meow-mix-slogan.jpg

Source: Walgreens

6. Verizon: “Can You Hear Me Now? Good.”

Here’s another brand that took its time coming up with something that truly resonated with its audience. This slogan was created in 2002 under the umbrella of the tagline, “We never stop working for you.”

While Verizon was founded in 1983, it continued to battle against various phone companies like AT&T and T-Mobile, still two of its strongest competitors. But what makes Verizon stand out? No matter where you are, you have service. You may not have the greatest texting options, or the best cellphone options, but you will always have service.

verizon-slogan.jpg

Source: MS Lumia Blog

7. The U.S. Marine Corps: “Semper Fi” 

Semper Fi, short for “Semper Fidelis,” is Latin for “always faithful” or “always loyal.” The saying has long been the official motto of the U.S. Marine Corps and is used to represent them in public appearances and the Marines’ official seal. 

What makes “Semper Fi” a great slogan for the Marines? It reveals the Marines’ defining characteristic in the armed forces — faithfulness and loyalty. It’s also a memorable proverb that explains why this organization can be counted on by the public.

marines-slogan-semper-fi8. Ronseal: “It Does Exactly What It Says on the Tin.”

Ronseal is a wood stain and dye manufacturer from the United Kingdom, and its 20-year-old slogan is perfect for the humble message the company is known for.

Ronseal’s slogan doesn’t really go above and beyond. It doesn’t make lofty promises to its customers. It simply endorses a functional product. So why is this slogan so catchy? Because its lack of volume actually speaks volumes to its audience. Too many companies try to break through the noise of their competitors by being so loud and ambitious, they forget what they stood for in the first place. Ronseal saw true value in basic reliability, and founded a slogan that allowed the company to stay right where its customers like it.

Ronsel's catchy slogan, Does exactly what it says on the tin

9. The Mosaic Company: “We Help the World Grow the Food It Needs”

The Mosaic Company’s slogan also happens to be its mission statement, which guarantees that this fertilizer maker’s brand strategy aligns with the company’s main interests.

Something all slogans should strive to do is look past the needs of the company, or even its users, and describe how the product or service helps the community. In this way, “We Help the World Grow the Food It Needs” is a heavy slogan that expresses not just what The Mosaic Company wants for its customers, but also what it wants for the public.

mosaic-company-slogan

Source: The Mosaic Company

10. Pitney Bowes: “We Power Transactions That Drive Commerce”

Pitney Bowes, the mailing and shipping software provider, has a slogan that follows a similar theme as The Mosaic Company in the section above: It’s focused not on the end user, but on the industry.

Pitney Bowes’ slogan shows us that its products don’t just help businesses track and deliver merchandise — they make the entire ecommerce community more efficient. It’s a good strategy, considering the alternative. How lame would the company’s slogan be if it were “We Power Transactions That Serve Our Clients’ Bottom Line”?  

Taglines

11. Nike: “Just Do It.”

Now, for the more well-known Nike message. “Just Do It” hovers over every product and event Nike creates or sponsors, and that’s exactly what makes it the company’s official tagline.

It didn’t take long for Nike’s message to resonate. The brand became more than just athletic apparel — it began to embody a state of mind. It encourages you to think that you don’t have to be an athlete to be in shape or tackle an obstacle. If you want to do it, just do it. That’s all it takes.

But it’s unlikely Kennedy + Weiden, the agency behind this tagline, knew from the start that Nike would brand itself in this way. In fact, Nike’s product used to cater almost exclusively to marathon runners, which are among the most hardcore athletes out there. The “Just Do It” campaign widened the funnel, and it’s proof positive that some brands need to take their time coming up with a tagline that reflects their message and resonates with their target audience

Nike's Just Do It tagline

Source: brandchannel

12. Apple: “Think Different.”

This tagline was first released in the Apple commercial called “Here’s to the Crazy Ones, Think Different” — a tribute to all the time-honored visionaries who challenged the status quo and changed the world. The phrase itself is a bold nod to IBM’s campaign “Think IBM,” which was used at the time to advertise its ThinkPad.

Soon after, the tagline “Think Different” accompanied Apple advertisements all over the place, even though Apple hadn’t released any significant new products at the time. All of a sudden, people began to realize that Apple wasn’t just any old computer; it was so powerful and so simple to use that it made the average computer user feel innovative and tech-savvy.

According to Forbes, Apple’s stock price tripled within a year of the commercial’s release. Although the tagline has been since retired, many Apple users still feel a sense of entitlement for being among those who “think different.”

Apple's tagline, Think Different, with a white apple logo

Source: Blue Fin Group

13. L’Oréal: “Because You’re Worth It.”

Who doesn’t want to feel like they’re worth it? The folks at L’Oréal worked with the theory that women wear makeup in order to make themselves appear “beautiful” so they feel desirable, wanted, and worth it. The tagline isn’t about the product — it’s about the image the product can get you. This message allowed L’Oréal to push its brand further than just utility so as to give the entire concept of makeup a much more powerful message.

Loreal's tagline, Because you're worth it

Source: Farah Khan

14. California Milk Processor Board: “Got Milk?”

While most people are familiar with the “Got Milk?” campaign, not everyone remembers that it was launched by the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB). What’s interesting about this campaign is that it was initially launched to combat the rapid increase in fast food and soft beverages: The CMPB wanted people to revert to milk as their drink of choice in order to sustain a healthier life. The campaign was meant to bring some life to a “boring” product, ad executives told TIME Magazine.

The simple words “Got Milk?” scribbled above celebrities, animals, and children with milk mustaches, which ran from 2003 until 2014 — making this campaign one of the longest-lasting ever. The CMPB wasn’t determined to make its brand known with this one — it was determined to infiltrate the idea of drinking milk across the nation. And these two simple words sure as heck did.

California Milk Processor's tagline, Got Milk? featuring Hugh Jackman as Wolverine with a milk mustache

Source: Broward Palm Beach News Times

15. BMW: “Designed for Driving Pleasure.”

BMW sells cars all over the world, but in North America, it was known for a long time by its tagline, “The Ultimate Driving Machine.” This phrase was created in the 1970s by a relatively unknown ad agency named Ammirati & Puris and was, according to BMW’s blog, directed at Baby Boomers who were “out of college, making money and ready to spend their hard earned dollars. What better way to reflect your success than on a premium automobile?”

The newer tagline, “Designed for Driving Pleasure,” is intended to reinforce the message that its cars’ biggest selling point is that they are performance vehicles that are thrilling to drive. That message is an emotional one, and one that consumers can buy into to pay the high price point.

bmw-designed-for-driving-pleasure-2.jpg

Source: Brandingmag

16. Tesco: “Every Little Helps”

“Every little helps” is the kind of catchy tagline that can make sense in many different contexts — and it’s flexible enough to fit in with any one of Tesco’s messages. It can refer to value, quality, service, and even environmental responsibility — which the company practices by addressing the impacts of their operations and supply chain.

It’s also, as Naresh Ramchandani wrote for The Guardian, “perhaps the most ingeniously modest” slogan or tagline ever written. Tesco markets itself as a brand for the people, and a flexible, modest far-reaching slogan like this one reflects that beautifully.

Tesco's catchy tagline, Every little helps with a red logo

Source: The Drum

17. Bounty: “The Quicker Picker Upper”

Bounty paper towels, made by Procter & Gamble, has used its catchy tagline “The Quicker Picker Upper” for almost 50 years now. If it sounds like one of those sing-songy play on words you learned as a kid, that’s because it is one: The tagline uses what’s called consonance — a poetic device characterized by the repetition of the same consonant two or more times in short succession (think: “pitter patter”).

Over the years, Bounty has moved away from this tagline in full, replacing “Quicker” with other adjectives, depending on the brand’s current marketing campaign — like “The Quilted Picker Upper” and “The Clean Picker Upper.” At the same time, the brand’s main web address went from quickerpickerupper.com to bountytowels.com. But although the brand is branching out into other campaigns, they’ve kept the theme of their original, catchy tagline.

Bounty paper towels' tagline, The Quicker Picker Upper

Source: Bounty

18. Lay’s: “Betcha Can’t Eat Just One.”

Seriously, who here has ever had just one chip? While this tagline might stand true for other snack companies, Lay’s was clever to pick up on it straight away. The company tapped into our truly human incapability to ignore crispy, salty goodness when it’s staring us in the face. Carbs, what a tangled web you weave.

But seriously, notice how the emphasis isn’t on the taste of the product. There are plenty of other delicious chips out there. But what Lay’s was able to bring forth with its tagline is that totally human, uncontrollable nature of snacking until the cows come home.

Lay's tagline, Betcha can't eat just one

Source: Amazon

19. Audi: “Vorsprung durch technik” (“Advancement Through Technology”)

“Vorsprung durch technik” has been Audi’s main German tagline everywhere in the world since 1971 (except for the United States, where the slogan is “Truth in Engineering”). While the phrase has been translated in several ways, the online dictionary LEO translates “Vorsprung” as “advance” or “lead” as in “distance, amount by which someone is ahead in a competition.” Audi roughly translates it as: “Advancement through technology.”

The first-generation Audio 80 (B1 series) was launched a year after the tagline in 1972, and the new car was a brilliant reflection of that tagline with many impressive new technical features. It was throughout the 1970s that the Audi brand established itself as an innovative car manufacturer, such as with the five-cylinder engine (1976), turbocharging (1979), and the quattro four-wheel drive (1980). This is still reflective of the Audi brand today.

Audi's tagline, says Vorsprung durch technik, written on a black storefront

Source: Cars and Coffee Chat

20. Dunkin’ Donuts: “America Runs on Dunkin'”

In April 2006, Dunkin’ Donuts launched the most significant repositioning effort in the company’s history by unveiling a brand new, multi-million dollar advertising campaign under the tagline “America Runs on Dunkin.” The campaign revolves around Dunkin’ Donuts coffee keeping busy Americans fueled while they are on the go.

“The new campaign is a fun and often quirky celebration of life, showing Americans embracing their work, their play and everything in between — accompanied every step of the way by Dunkin’ Donuts,” read the official press release from the campaign’s official launch.

Ten years later, what the folks at Dunkin Donuts’ realized they were missing was their celebration of and honoring their actual customers. That’s why, in 2016, they launched the “Keep On” campaign, which they call their modern interpretation of the ten-year tagline.

“It’s the idea that we’re your partner in crime, or we’re like your wingman, your buddy in your daily struggle and we give you the positive energy through both food and beverage but also emotionally, we believe in you and we believe in the consumer,” said Chris D’Amico, SVP and Group Creative Director at Hill Holiday.

Dunkin' Donuts' tagline, America runs on Dunkin'

Source: Lane Printing & Advertising

(Fun fact: Dunkin’ Donuts is testing out rebranding — and renaming itself. One store in Pasadena, California will be called, simply, Dunkin’.)

21. McDonald’s: “I’m Lovin’ It”

The “I’m Lovin’ It” campaign was launched way back in 2003 and still stands strong today. This is a great example of a tagline that resonates with the brand’s target audience. McDonald’s food might not be your healthiest choice, but being healthy isn’t the benefit McDonald’s is promising — it’s that you’ll love the taste and the convenience.

(Fun fact: The jingle’s infamous hook — “ba da ba ba ba” — was originally sung by Justin Timberlake.)

McDonald's golden arches with the tagline, I'm lovin' it

Source: McDonald’s

22. The New York Times: “All the News That’s Fit to Print”

This one is my personal favorite. The tagline was created in the late 1890s as a movement of opposition against other news publications printing lurid journalism. The New York Times didn’t stand for sensationalism. Instead, it focused on important facts and stories that would educate its audience. It literally deemed its content all the real “news fit to print.”

This helped the paper become more than just a news outlet, but a company that paved the way for credible news. The company didn’t force a tagline upon people when it first was founded, but rather, it created one in a time where it was needed most.

new-york-times-tagline.jpg

Source: 4th St8 Blog

23. General Electric: “Imagination at Work.”

You may remember General Electric’s former tagline, “We Bring Good Things to Life,” which was initiated in 1979. Although this tagline was well-known and well-received, the new tagline — “Imagination at Work” — shows how a company’s internal culture can revolutionize how they see their own brand.

“‘Imagination at Work’ began as an internal theme at GE,” recalled Tim McCleary, GE’s manager of corporate identity. When Jeff Immelt became CEO of GE in 2001, he announced that his goal was to reconnect with GE’s roots as a company defined by innovation.

This culture and theme resulted in a rebranding with the new tagline “Imagination at Work,” which embodies the idea that imagination inspires the human initiative to thrive at what we do.

24. State Farm: “Like a Good Neighbor, State Farm is There”

The insurance company State Farm has a number of taglines, including “Get to a better State” and “No one serves you better than State Farm.” Recently, the company updated its tagline to “We’re here to help life go right.”

But State Farm’s most famous tagline is the jingle, “Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there,” which you’re likely familiar with if you live in the United States and watch television.

These words emphasize State Farm’s “community-first” value proposition — which sets it apart from the huge, bureaucratic feel of most insurance companies. And it quickly establishes a close relationship with the consumer.

Often, customers need insurance when they least expect it — and in those situations, State Farm is responding in friendly, neighborly language.

StateFarm_Logo.png

Source: StateFarm

25. Maybelline: “Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s Maybelline.”

Can you sing this jingle in your head? Maybelline’s former tagline, created in the 1990s, is one of the most famous in the world. It makes you think of glossy magazine pages featuring strong, beautiful women with long lashes staring straight down the lens. It’s that confidence that Maybelline’s makeup brand is all about — specifically, the transformation into a confident woman through makeup.

Maybelline changed its tagline to “Make IT Happen” in February 2016, inspiring women to “express their beauty in their own way.” Despite this change, the former tagline remains powerful and ubiquitous, especially among the many generations that grew up with it.

maybelline-tagline.jpg

Source: FunnyJunk

26. The U.S. Marine Corps: “The Few. The Proud. The Marines.”

While “Semper Fi” is one the the U.S. Marine Corps’ most coveted slogans (or, more officially, mottos), it has had a handful of top-notch recruiting taglines over the decades as well. These include “First to fight” starting in World War I, to “We’re looking for a few good men” from the 1980s. 

However, we’d argue that “The Few. The Proud. The Marines.” is among the best organization taglines out there.

This tagline “underscores the high caliber of those who join and serve their country as Marines,” said Maj. Gen. Richard T. Tryon, former commanding general of Marine Corps Recruiting Command. In 2007, it even earned a spot on Madison Avenue’s Advertising Walk of Fame.

US_Marine_Corps_tagline.png

Source: Marines.com

Want more? Read Quiz: Can You Guess the Brands Behind These 16 Slogans?

Toonly Opiniones, ¿cuál es la diferencia entre este Programa para hacer Videos Animados y Powtoon?

Recuerdo lo que le pasó a un amigo ilustrador con un cliente. Hizo un video animado para una cadena de comida rápida. El personaje principal era un pollo que vestía zapatos rojos. Al ver el trabajo terminado, resulta que el cliente los prefería azules. Para tratar de ayudarlo, esa fue la primera vez que busqué en Google: Toonly Opiniones.

En aquella ocasión, lo que mi amigo tuvo que hacer fue cambiar el color de los zapatos cuadro por cuadro, lo que le llevó un montón de tiempo. Por eso me pregunté, ¿en serio es la única forma de hacer animaciones en video? Y descubrí que no.

Actualmente, cualquier programa para hacer videos animados facilita ese trabajo. Doodly, Toonly y Powtoon son tres de los más conocidos. Funcionan con el sistema de soltar y arrastrar, no se necesitan conocimientos técnicos y puedes cambiar el color de los zapatos de cualquier pollo con solo un clic.

En esta ocasión, para los que igual que yo buscan Toonly Opiniones, voy a hacer una comparativa entre Toonly y Powtoon, dos aplicaciones para hacer animaciones. Sí, ambos funcionan en línea.

Dichas herramientas tienen características que las hacen similares, pero también conservan diferencias.

>>> Programas para hacer videos animados: Doodly vs. Toonly

 

Toonly Opiniones: ¿cómo funciona este Programa para hacer Videos Animados?

En materia de Toonly Opiniones, lo mejor es verlo en acción. Te comparto la demo que hicimos en Socialancer donde podrás aprender todas las características de este programa para hacer videos animados. Sin embargo, sigue leyendo porque te voy a dar mi punto de vista. 

 

Toonly te permite crear videos animados online para varios nichos con la sencillez de soltar y arrastrar elementos. Tiene un estilo de animación tradicional, el mismo de los dibujos animados que viste durante toda tu infancia.

Al comprar el software te llega un mail con un link de descarga y los datos de acceso. Esto es importante porque si bien se descarga en la computadora, Toonly se aloja en la nube, lo cual representa varias cosas:

  • No ocupa espacio en tu equipo.
  • Lo puedes descargar en todas las computadoras que desees.
  • Es multiusuario porque todas las personas a las que les des los datos de ingreso, podrán utilizarlo. Aquí quiero hacer una precisión, no hay carpetas personalizadas, todos verán el trabajo que se ha realizado.
  • Las actualizaciones del software se hacen automáticamente.

¿Qué es lo que hace único a este Editor de Videos?: Toonly Opiniones

Antes de proseguir con el post de Toonly Opiniones, quiero mostrarte cómo es la herramienta por dentro. Haz clic en la flecha para ver todas las imágenes.

toonly opiniones 1
toonly opiniones 2
toonly opiniones 3
toonly opiniones 4
toonly opiniones 5
toonly opiniones 6

 

 

La versión Estándar de Toonly tiene 10 personajes con 20 poses cada uno. Esto en realidad te da 200 posibilidades. Los dibujos fueron diseñados por el equipo de Toonly, por lo que tu video no se parecerá a ningún otro. 

Además cuenta con 20 escenas de fondos y cientos de accesorios. Pero, puedes tomar elementos de todos las escenas y crear la tuya propia en un lienzo blanco. Esto lo hace uno de los mejores programas para hacer animaciones.

Te permite agregar voz. Ya sea que la grabes directamente en la plataforma o la subas en un archivo de audio. También cuenta con 20 pistas de música libres de derechos.

Para mostrarte lo fácil que es crear animaciones en Toonly, preparé un gif.

Fíjate que en la opción Type elegí “Say Hi”. Quiero que el personaje salude. Y en In Effect, seleccioné “Bounce”. Con esto hago que el personaje entre con un efecto de rebote y agite la mano. Te muestro cómo quedó la animación.

toonly opiniones animacion

 

Monetizar YouTube con videos de Toonly

Los videos terminados de Toonly se descargan en un archivo .mp4 y en diferentes resoluciones. Desde una muy baja de 360 píxeles hasta definiciones altas como el 4K. Esa es una información que generalmente encuentras cuando buscas Toonly Opiniones.

Esta particularidad permite que puedas usar los videos para monetizar tu canal de YouTube.

Con esta herramienta, además, no tendrás problemas con los derechos de autor. Google permite monetizar videos realizados desde softwares de edición de video. 

Por ello, Toonly también es considerado un editor de videos para YouTube.

>>> ¿Qué tipo de contenido puedo monetizar en YouTube?

Debes tener en cuenta que con la versión Estándar de Toonly solo podrás utilizar las creaciones en tus propios proyectos; si quieres venderlas a clientes, deberás ampliar a la licencia Enterprise.

Fortalezas y debilidades de Powtoon Gratis

Para que el artículo sobre Toonly Opiniones quede completo, decidí utilizar otra herramienta de referencia que me permitiera hacer una comparación. Powtoon es un software que me ayudará en la labor.

Permite crear videos animados gratis a través de plantillas. Además, no todos son con dibujos. Hay otros videos donde aparecen personas y locaciones reales. 

toonly opiniones powtoon

 

Lo que más llama la atención de Powtoon es su licencia gratis. Te permite crear videos de hasta 3 minutos pero hay un pero: aparece la marca Powtoon.

toonly opiniones marca

Otro punto que no me encanta de la versión gratis es que los videos se alojan en el servidor de Powtoon y te permiten un máximo de 100 megas. 

Esto quiere decir que los videos son chicos. Pero lo que menos me gusta es que no permite bajarlos en .mp4. Supuestamente, puedes publicarlos en YouTube, pero yo no pude vincular mi cuenta y solo obtuve un link para compartir.

Les doy el beneficio de la duda y tal vez fue una falta de habilidad mía.

Otra cosa es que solo puedes usar los videos animados para proyectos propios porque no te da licencia comercial.

Al buscar Toonly Opiniones siempre te recomiendo ver el asunto de las licencias porque eso determinará si los videos son para uso personal o los puedes vender.

Puedes escoger entre 5 tipos de aspectos: moderno, pizarra blanca, dibujos animados, infografía y aspecto realista. Cada uno tiene personajes, escenas y situaciones. Para ver todas las capturas de pantalla haz clic en la flecha.

toonly opiniones powtoon1
toonly opiniones powtoon2
toonly opiniones powtoon3
toonly opiniones powtoon4
toonly opiniones powtoon5

 

 

Entonces, recapitulo. Las fortalezas y debilidades de Powtoon Gratis son las siguientes:

  • Funciona con el sistema de soltar y arrastrar.
  • Puedes crear videos desde plantillas o a partir de un lienzo en blanco.
  • Tiene varios estilos de animaciones como los de aspecto realista, pizarra blanca, etc.
  • En contraparte, el máximo de duración de los videos en la versión gratis es de 3 minutos.
  • Aparece la marca Powtoon.
  • Puedes almacenar un máximo de 100 megas.
  • No se descargan en .mp4.

Powtoon y Toonly Opiniones: cuadro comparativo de funcionalidades

 

Toonly

Powtoon

Funciona con plantillas y lienzo en blanco. Funciona con plantillas y lienzo en blanco.
Tiene animación tradicional de dibujos animados. Tiene varios tipos de animaciones.
No tiene versión gratis. Sí tiene versión gratis.
No hay límite en la duración de los videos. La versión gratis permite videos de máximo 3 minutos de duración.
No aparece la marca Toonly. En la versión gratis aparece la marca Powtoon.
Es de pago único. Las licencias de pago son de suscripción mensual. 
Los videos se descargan en .mp4 La versión gratis no permite descargas en .mp4
Los videos se pueden subir a YouTube La versión gratis dice que los videos se pueden subir a YouTube pero yo no pude vincular mi cuenta.

 

Mejores editores de video: Precios y planes de Toonly y Powtoon

Al hablar sobre Toonly Opiniones obviamente hay que mencionar los precios tanto de Toonly como de Powtoon.

Como ya mencioné, Toonly no tiene una versión gratis, pero sí un periodo de prueba de 30 días. Si la herramienta no es lo que esperabas, te reembolsan tu dinero.

Powtoon, por el contrario, sí tiene una versión gratuita. Honestamente, a mí me pareció muy limitada y poco funcional porque puedes hacer videos de máximo 3 minutos, sin licencia comercial y no los puedes exportar en .mp4. Te dan un link pero el máximo de almacenamiento es de 100 megas, o sea, que son videos muy pequeños.

Toonly es de pago único, esta es una fortaleza al buscar Toonly Opiniones. Tiene una versión Estándar sin derechos comerciales pero sin límite de videos. Al cierre de esta edición costaba 67$. No te aparece la marca, es multiusuario y descargas tus creaciones en archivos .mp4.

A partir de ahí puedes ampliar a la versión Enterprise. Incluye más escenas, personajes y licencia comercial. Al momento del cierre de esta edición costaba un pago único de $97.

Powtoon, por su parte, tiene tres licencias de pago mensuales. La PRO ronda los $19 si y solo si haces el pago anual, o sea, debes pagar los 12 meses en una sola emisión (si lo pagas cada mes sube a $89).

Solamente puedes exportar 5 videos al mes en .mp4.

La licencia PRO+ cuesta $39 si haces el pago anual (si lo pagas cada mes sube a $197). No tiene límites para exportar en .mp4 y te da los derechos comerciales. 

La licencia Agency cuesta $99 al mes y solo te da la opción de hacer el pago anualmente. También ofrece exportaciones ilimitadas, derechos comerciales y algo que llaman Third-Party Resell Rights, es decir, le vendes los videos a alguien que a su vez los puede volver a vender.

 

Conclusión sobre Toonly Opiniones vs. Powtoon

Siempre que se trata de recomendar una herramienta para mí es importante tener en cuenta el contexto del usuario. No hay una verdad absoluta sobre Toonly Opiniones o Powtoon.

Todo depende de para qué necesitas la herramienta. Si no requieres hacer videos con aspecto profesional, es decir, que no te afecte que aparezca la marca Powtoon, seguramente la versión gratis te funcionará. 

Es muy intuitiva y fácil de usar.

Sin embargo, si vas a acceder a la versión de pago, es muy probable que te convenga más Toonly porque es de pago único. Además, no tiene restricciones de descargas de los videos y te permite seleccionar el formato de descarga adecuado en cada ocasión.

Es multiusuario, se aloja en la nube y resulta muy fácil de aprender a utilizar.

Si compras Toonly desde Socialancer, te ofrecemos nuestros bonos exclusivos y  soporte en español para ayudarte con cualquier duda que te pueda surgir.

Me gustaría saber tus necesidades, ¿hay alguna herramienta de edición de video de la que te gustaría que hable?

from Socialancer https://ift.tt/39Q8tPS
via

8 Ways Digital Rewards Can Help Marketers to Stand Out

Many of us scroll past ads in our newsfeed, delete emails, or even run to the bathroom during commercial breaks.

As consumers, we’re constantly bombarded with advertisements and calls-to-action. This is the challenge of marketing: campaigns are everywhere.

And, if campaigns are everywhere, they can be easier to tune out and ignore.

In fact, social click-through rates on ads went from 2.6% in late 2018 to 2% in late 2019, a sure sign that social media users have advertising fatigue.

Ultimately, marketers need to try increasingly new and innovative approaches to grab consumers’ attention. Marketers work hard daily to create the exception: a message that can’t be ignored.

Here, we’re going to dive into one innovative strategy that could help marketers’ stand out in 2020: digital rewards.

Digital Rewards: The Secret Weapon for Standing Out

Digital rewards are e-gift cards, either from retailers or virtual Visa/Mastercards that can be delivered in an instant via a link or email. These virtual rewards can help you stand out against competitors.

More often than not, marketers ask for consumer’s attention without much upfront benefit. Every time consumers see marketing campaigns, they make a decision within seconds — and it often follows the logic of, “if I click this Facebook ad, am I really going to buy this product?” They risk spending valuable time evaluating a purchase, but then ultimately decide not to. Digital rewards minimize that risk by creating tangible upfront value.

In addition, digital rewards are a kind gesture that lets a prospective customer know you value their time. It’s a way of recognizing their engagement and saying “thank you” for their attention. Gift giving is a classic way that humans show warmth and appreciation for others.

Digital rewards enable you to tap into this age-old societal practice and modernize it for the virtual era. By sending personalized digital rewards, you create human connections despite physical distance.

Because digital rewards are a lesser-known tool, you may be wondering how to incorporate them into your current marketing strategy. Below are eight ways to boost marketing campaigns with digital rewards to accelerate engagement and maximize campaign ROI.

Digital Rewards Strategies and Examples

1. Host incentivized webinars for your target audience.

What this looks like: “Attend our live webinar for a $10 thank you gift!”

Why you should do it: Incentivized webinars make it easier for consumers to evaluate your product. Additionally, the upfront value excites consumers and makes these webinars much more effective at lead generation than typical webinars.

Plus, the reward delivery email can be prime real estate to feature follow-up content and calls-to-action. Consumers tend to be more willing to provide data in exchange for coupons, loyalty points, or rewards, making it a powerful tool in accelerating the buyer’s journey.

2. Compensate prospects and customers for taking surveys and sharing feedback.

What this looks like: “Tell us how you’re liking our latest update for a $15 reward.”

Why you should do it: Brand goodwill will come naturally when your consumers feel that you value their time and feedback. Simply saying you appreciate their feedback doesn’t do much to motivate a survey response. Digital rewards create motivation so you can worry less about representative bias and get the answers you need.

In other words, you don’t have to worry about feedback from people who only love or hate your product. You want to capture everyone’s feelings, and digital rewards can motivate the otherwise neutral crowd. With accurate data, your company will have the insights to adapt swiftly to shifting consumer preferences. Most importantly, your consumers will know you truly value what they have to say.

3. Leverage rewards within your ABM program.

What this looks like: Asking for a meeting with a key contact and sending a $25 reward as a thank you for their time.

Why you should do it: If you know you want a customer, digital rewards are a great way to show you appreciate their time. Digital rewards can be a powerful tool to fast track an ABM campaign and get the attention of the right people. Everyone loves receiving gifts, and digital rewards can be the perfect gift for relationship building.

4. Create a referral marketing program to turn your customers into brand advocates.

What this looks like: “Get a $10 reward when you refer a friend. When your friend makes their first purchase, they will also get a $10 reward as a welcome from our team.”

Why you should do it: An effective referral marketing program turns your customers into your second sales team. A University of Chicago study found that non-cash incentives are 24% more effective at boosting performance than cash incentives. Digital rewards for referrals can be an effective lead generation tool that also establishes brand loyalty and goodwill with existing customers.

5. Boost your brand’s online reputation by rewarding customers for writing a review.

What this looks like: “Write a review of our software on Yelp or TrustPilot for a $5 reward.”

Why you should do it: Thanking customers for providing feedback builds brand goodwill. Their reviews will help you leverage word-of-mouth marketing and tap into new audiences who may be shopping for a product like yours.

6. Establish customer appreciation programs.

What this looks like: “Thanks for being a loyal customer! Here’s a $10 reward for lunch on us.”

Why you should do it: Customer appreciation programs establish brand goodwill, increase customer satisfaction, and develop long-term loyalty. Recognize and celebrate customer achievements and milestones with digital rewards. These happy customers will be more likely to engage in positive word-of-mouth marketing for your brand.

7. Reward prospects for attending a product demo.

What this looks like: “Join a brief 15-min demo for a $5 reward.”

Why you should do it: Digital rewards show people you appreciate their time right away. Pairing them with demos helps jumpstart the buyer’s journey and get your Product team the feedback they need to ensure a great product. Like the incentivized webinar, use the follow-up reward email to your advantage by offering more content and calls-to-action.

8. Host a giveaway as a reward for promoting your product or service on social media.

What this looks like: “Post about us on your Instagram to win a $20 reward!”

Why you should do it: Digital rewards can help your brand kick off an influencer marketing campaign without the transactional pressure cash creates. Plus, showing prospects you value their time and social audiences with a reward creates a positive relationship and can help your brand reach new audiences.

However, you don’t want to give $20 to everyone who posts about you on their social pages — it could result in thousands of lost revenue without much to gain.

Instead, host a giveaway where the first 100 posters will receive a reward in exchange for re-sharing your post on their story and tagging a friend in the comments. That way, everyone feels as if they have a legitimate chance to win, and you still have dollars left in your marketing budget!

With the right incentives management platform, you can easily automate these limits and avoid any budget disasters.

There’s lots of ideas above for you to consider, but here’s the good news: you’re probably already executing most of these ideas in some capacity, so just take a step back and see how you can add digital rewards into your current marketing strategy.

Digital rewards are easy to set up and a quick addition to your marketing toolbox, making them a nifty trick to keep handy when you need a boost. An extra bonus is you can easily integrate digital rewards into your HubSpot workflows. “Request to connect” our Rybbon digital rewards app found within the HubSpot Marketplace. Experiment with digital rewards in your next campaign and let the results speak for itself!

Apps for Instagram Stories Video Editing

Want more editing options for your Instagram Stories video? Looking for apps to edit and produce creative Instagram Stories video? In this article, you’ll discover how to change the playback speed of your video, add transitions between clips, apply effect filters, change the aspect ratio, and more. You’ll also find out how to quickly format […]

The post Apps for Instagram Stories Video Editing appeared first on Social Media Examiner | Social Media Marketing.

from Social Media Examiner | Social Media Marketing https://ift.tt/3flQFNO
via socialmediaexaminer

16 Awesome Email Marketing Campaigns & How to Run Your Own

Consumers love connecting with brands via email, and it’s a channel that continues to provide ROI. In fact, for every $1 spent on email marketing, marketers receive an average of $42 in return (HubSpot State of Marketing 2020). 

Not only is email not dead, but 78% of marketers have seen an increase in engagement on this channel over the course of the last year. As we strive to connect with our prospects and customers and provide them with value, our email marketing campaigns must resonate.

Inbound marketing is an ongoing process as marketers meet buyers in whatever stage of the journey they’re in. Keep in mind that not everyone is ready to buy from you at this exact moment

That’s why email is such an important channel. 

Through email, you’re able to stay top-of-mind by providing communication to their personal inbox, and you can do it at scale with marketing automation software.

1. Identify your goal for the campaign.

Figure out the outcome that you want:

  • Is it to clean up your list?
  • Promote a new product?
  • Follow-up from an abandoned cart event?
  • Stay top of mind with your audience?

Different email campaigns will have different outcomes, requiring different tactics to get there. Once you determine the purpose of your campaign, you can then create the targets you want to hit. Include specific metrics in your goal so that you can determine if your campaign was a success based on quantitative data.

2. Put yourself in the shoes of the buyer persona.

After you’ve identified the outcome and the goals you want to hit, you now need to strategize how to get your buyer persona from A to B. Some things to ask yourself might include:

  • How did they subscribe in the first place?
  • What matters to them?
  • How can this campaign provide value?

3. Build a targeted list and define enrollment criteria.

You know who you’re targeting and what you want them to do. From there, you must build the segment. Thinking about your buyer persona, what properties do they all have in common? How does your CRM describe those properties?

Your software is smart, but it’s not smart enough to automatically know which recipients you’re sending to. Will the recipients receive the emails at the same time, or is there certain criteria they have to meet before they are enrolled in the sequence or campaign?

4. Determine the timeline you want the campaign to run.

You may be running a seasonal campaign that only requires one or two emails, or you might be building a long-term top-of-mind nurturing campaign. Tailor the length of your email sequence to the length of the buying cycle and stage the persona is at in the buyer’s journey. In other words, deliver the right message at the right time.

5. Plan your emails and follow-ups.

Over the course of the campaigns timeline, you may want multiple touch points. You may also even consider follow-ups based on the actions that each recipient takes. Plan these emails out, outlining the core message and take-away for each email.

6. Write click-worthy subject lines.

The subject line is the gate keeper of the rest of your email. Your buyer persona will not be exposed to your content unless they first click the subject line. With that in mind, use this precious real estate for copy that compels them to read further. You can do that by:

  • Piquing their interest
  • Promising value
  • Opening a loop (that will be closed in the body of the email)
  • Using your unique voice to start the conversation
  • Use personalization

7. Create your brand assets.

Intentional and well-placed imagery can increase click-through rates, so put thought into not just what you want to say but how you want to say it, using visuals to support your message.

8. Include clear calls to action.

Don’t confuse your email contacts by providing too many options. For each email you send, there should be a single action that you want the reader to take. Then, in clear, direct language, instruct them to take that action and set expectations for what will happen when they do.

9. Always provide a way for them to opt out.

People who don’t want to read your emails don’t belong on your list. Keeping them only skews your bounce rate down and increases the number of people marketing your emails as spam. Besides, according to CAN-SPAM guidelines, you should always provide a way for them to opt-out of email if they no longer want to receive communications from you. Typically, this opt-out link lives in the footer of each email you send.

10. Monitor your metrics.

As the campaign runs, take notes. Are your open rates and click rates what you expected? What went well vs. not well? Are you on track to hitting your goals with the campaign?

The more you pay attention to the data, the more you can understand what’s working and what’s not for your audience, leading to more effective campaigns in the future.

16 of the Best Email Marketing Campaign Examples

If you’re reading this, you probably have an email address (or two, or three …). In fact, you’ve probably been sending and receiving emails for years, and you’ve definitely received some questionable deliveries in your inbox.

Whether they were unexpected, uninformative, or had a subject line tHaT wAs fOrmAtTeD liKe tHiS, we bet you didn’t hesitate to direct them towards the trash, right?

While email has managed to stand the test of time, many marketers have failed to update their strategies since its inception. So to ensure you’re sending modern emails that warrant some of your recipients’ precious time and attention, we’ve compiled a list of effective email examples to inspire your next campaign. 

1. PayPal

There are a couple things we love about this email example from PayPal. Not only is the opening copy clever and concise, but the entire concept also reflects a relatable benefit of using the service. Think about it: How many times have you been in a situation where you went out to dinner with friends and then fussed over the bill when it came time to pay? By tapping into this common pain point, PayPal is able to pique the interest of its audience. 

paypal email that reads "good food. good friends. good way to split the bill" and a call to action below that reads "learn about sending & receiving money"

2. ModCloth 

Great companies are always evolving, and your customers expect to experience change. What they don’t expect (because too many companies haven’t lived up to this end of the bargain) is to be told about those changes. That said, this email from ModCloth serves as a refreshing change of pace. If you’re going to change the way you communicate with a lead or customer, give them clear, fair warning so, if they aren’t on board, they can make the necessary adjustments to keep their inbox clean.

modcloth email that reads "we're making changes to our email program" with the option to change email preferences and promotional material underneath

3. Tory Burch

Did you see that? Did you see it move? Pretty cool, right? This small bit of animation helps to separate this email from Tory Burch from all of the immobile emails in their recipient’s inboxes. They also leverage exclusivity by framing the promotion as a “private” sale. Often times, this type of positioning makes the recipient feel like they’re specially chosen, which encourages them to take advantage of the special opportunity they’ve been presented with. 

tory burch email with animation with curtains that pull back to reveal text: "tory burch online only private sale up to 70% off"

Inspired by these examples? Check out HubSpot’s free email marketing tool and start creating your own campaigns.

4. Zipcar

This example sample comes courtesy of my coworker who started signing up for Zipcar, got busy, and had to abandon the form. As a result, the email calls her back to the website with some lighthearted copy that nudges her in the right direction, and also reminds her of the value of using Zipcar — being economical and helping the planet.

If your site visitors are abandoning shopping carts or landing pages, use your email marketing in this way to remind them they have some unfinished business on your website!

zipcar abandonment email that reads "your wheels are waiting. yoo hoo. just another friendly nudge to say that zipsterhood is right around the corner." Below, there's a link to finish the application.

5. RunKeeper

RunKeeper makes an effort to reengage lost users with this friendly, informational email. By highlighting their app’s most recent changes and benefits, the copy works to entice recipients to give the app another chance. Small inclusions like the “Hi friend” greeting and the “You rock” closing makes the content feel welcoming and less aggressive. 

runkeeper elite email that reads "hi friend, runkeeper elite is looking pretty fresh these days and we'd love for you to give it another try" with details on what has changed and a call to action to "renew elite"

6. Litmus

Here’s another great example from Litmus of animation being used to create more interesting email marketing design. Unlike static text, the swipe motion used to provide recipients with a look “under the hood” of their email tool is eye-catching and encourages you to take a deeper dive into the rest of the content. Not to mention the header does an excellent job of explicitly stating what this email is about.

litmus email with animation that reveals code behind an image underneath a headline that reads "share emails and inspect code - ever wished for an easier way to share emails? Tried in vain to see how that responsive design works under the hood? now you can"

7. Loft

This email from Loft aims to demonstrate their understanding of your crazy, mixed-value inbox. In an effort to provide you with emails that you actually want to open, Loft asks that their recipients update their preferences to help them deliver a more personalized experience. This customer-focused email is super effective in making the recipient feel like their likes, dislikes, and opinions actually matter. 

loft email example that reads "happy inbox, happy life - we want to send you the style news that you can actually use. all you need to do is manage your preferences." in an attractive vertical layout

8. UncommonGoods 

You’ve heard it a million times (and a few thousand of those times may have been from us): You should create a sense of urgency with your calls-to-action. That’s what makes a lead take action, right? Well, this email from UncommonGoods succeeds in creating a sense of urgency by focusing on the value of acting now. 

Instead of saying, “Order your Mother’s Day gift NOW before Preferred Shipping ends!”, this email asks, “Don’t you think Mom would’ve liked a faster delivery?” Why yes, she would. Thank you for reminding me before it’s too late — I don’t want to be in the dog house because my gift arrived after Mother’s Day.

uncommon goods email that reads "don't you think mom would've liked a faster delivery?" along with shipping promotion that reads "send gifts home in time for mother's day"

9. JetBlue

Confession: We have a serious email marketing crush on JetBlue. And they continue to deliver their lovable marketing in this cheeky email campaign that aims to humorously reengage customers. Every element from the header, to the three witty points, to the actionable, contrasting CTA work together to create a lovable campaign that’s promotional without being pushy. 

JetBlue email that reads "it's our one year anniversary. we've been emailing for 365 days now" below, it reads "it's OK you didn't remember this one-year mile(high)stone" and "a traditional first anniversary gift is paper - hello plane ticket! but since you did forget it was our anniversary, this trip's on you"

10. Bonobos

It’s simple: If you want people to engage with your emails, give them a reason to do so. This clean, minimalistic, and easy-to-click email campaign from Bonobos creates an interactive experience that encourages the recipient to take action.

The structure of this email aims to cater to those who don’t have time to waste scrolling through pages of shorts that may or may not be in stock in their size. By providing a direct pathway to what they’re looking for, Bonobos creates a seamless online shopping experience.

bonobos email with a large image of a man in an adirondack chair above a headline that reads "select your size and get 25% off all shorts"

11. Amazon Local

This email from Amazon Local is short and sweet, with just one CTA: click through this email to tell Amazon what you like and dislike. That way, the deals they send you going forward can be more in line with what you’re likely to actually want. What’s wonderful about this experience is not just that they asked, but also how consistent the experience is from email to landing page. Take a look at the email below, and the landing page that follows.

amazon local email marketing that reads "you're one click away from personalized deals - improve your amazonlocal experience by telling us what you like and dislike."

 
Notice how the language in the email above, “like” and “dislike,” mirrors the language in the buttons below? This is a simple way to get feedback from your email recipients to provide more personalized offers in their inbox, thus increasing the chance of a high clickthrough and offer redemption rate.
 
amazon local deal preferences that reads "what kinds of deals do you like" along with a list of options that you can rate like, neutral, or dislike

12. Focus Pointe Global

Focus Pointe Global provides focus groups so regular businesses can get some meaty market research. While research is known for being a little complicated, this email is impressively simple. All of the information you need to know to determine whether you want to participate is called out in bold, and extremely short explanatory copy follows it.

What is the survey about? What do I get for taking it? How long will it take? Where can I begin? You can figure this all out pretty immediately. All emails should aim to provide such clear instruction.

focus pointe copywriting and cta email that includes section for topic, incentive, length, and spots available along with a cta email that reads "start survey"

13. Harpoon Brewery

My friends at Harpoon are so thoughtful, aren’t they? This simple, timely email really does feel like it’s coming from a friend, which is why it’s so effective. In an age of email automation, it’s easy for email campaigns to feel a little robotic. And while I’m certain that this email was, in fact, automated, it feels really human.

If you’re looking to strengthen the relationship you have with your existing customers, consider taking the time to set up a quick email like this to let them know you’re thinking of them. 

harpoon brewery email with a photo of the staff that reads "happy birthday carly from your friends at harpoon"

14. Bonafide

HubSpot customer Bonafide uses this email in one of its lead nurturing email series, and it’s a great example of a principle so many email marketers forget. Your inbox recipients don’t always remember who you are! 

Take a look at the callout in orange — the first paragraph of this email tells the reader why they are being contacted. With the amount of inbox overload we all suffer, reminders of this nature are critical to preventing deletions and unsubscribes. 

bonafide email that reads "you downloaded our step-by-step guide to internet marketing a while back and I wanted to follow up with you and see if you had any luck implementing any of the strategies contained in the eBook"

15. Rip Curl

“JOIN THE REVOLUTION.”

That’s quite powerful, wouldn’t you agree? Rip Curl, an Australian surfing sportswear retailer, combines urgency and our psychological need to be part of something to create an email headline that jumps off the page. This positioning is designed to lead people to believe that there’s a “revolution” taking place and it’s their turn to get in on the action. At the end of the day, people want to be part of something that’s bigger than themselves, and this email aims to motivate them to do so by purchasing this sleek watch.

ripcurl email that reads "join the revolution - searchgps watch exclusive subscriber release" underneath a banner of a watch under water

16. J.Crew Factory

For many of us, when it comes to wrapping gifts, the struggle is real. J.Crew Factory recognized this problem, and then created this email to serve as a solution for those incapable of pulling off a Pinterest-esque wrap job: gift cards. The email offers up two different says to pick up a gift card — in store or online — in an effort to avoid excluding anyone. 

They’ve also included a map of the nearest store location at the end of the email to lower the purchasing barrier even further. 

j.crew factory email that reads 'if your wrapping looks like this, you may want to get them a gift card' with an image of a bad wrapping job barely concealing what's obviously a backpack

Clearly, marketing campaigns come in all shapes and sizes. Cultivate a healthy list, write great subject lines, deliver valuable content to your recipients’ inboxes, and you’re on your way to hitting your email marketing goals.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in May 2012 and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.