Poll: What content would you like to hear on other Beats radio stations?

When Apple was discovered to have applied for trademarks for Beats 2, 3, 4, etc, it seemed pretty obvious the company was considering expanding its 24/7 Beats 1 radio station that it’s promoted as a key part of its new Apple Music service since launch. And It’s not a stretch to imagine how it could easily expand on the mainstream programming found on Beats 1 currently. Think of a 24/7 station that focuses specifically on one genre like rock, jazz, or hip-hop, for example, with shows programmed to focus on subgenres or featuring guest hosts and regular segments much like Apple’s Beats 1 station. To me this seems like a natural progression for Beats radio as part of Apple Music, but it’s possible Apple could also include more than just more music with Beats 2, 3, and beyond. Sports/Talk Radio/Podcasts… Apple already could have a bit of a head start with talk radio content beyond music if you consider iTunes and its dominance when it comes to attracting podcasters. Most popular podcasters are already distributing content through iTunes and as of this year estimates say most mobile podcast listening— around 82%— is happening on iPhones and in Apple’s own Podcasting app. With Spotify, Google and other music streaming competitors recently integrating podcasts, Apple has to be at least considering the potential of content beyond music for its streaming service. A Podcasts app for the new Apple TV is apparently on the horizon, but that doesn’t necessarily rule out bringing sports programming, talk radio, and podcast-style series to Apple Music and Beats radio. Sports alone, for instance, is a category big enough to...

How to Earn Free Press for Your Business When You Have No Connections

“Is that guy wearing leggings?” “We should start a business selling male leggings.” That’s all it took. One week later my business partners and I stood freezing in London’s Brick Lane Market with 22 pairs of female leggings “branded” with our male leggings brand. But after eight hours in the cold, we saw zero sales.  Fast forward two years, and sTitch Leggings was being prominently featured on the Daily Mail — an article from which we’re still converting traffic. So how do you build press for a startup when you have no connections?  I’ll walk you through some tips and examples below to help you learn how to get started and earn some recognition for your product or service.  How To Get Free Press For Your Startup When You Have No Connections 1) Be remarkable. We’ve all heard people use the word “remarkable” before, but what does it really mean? According to Merriam-Webster, being remarkable means being “unusual or surprising” or “likely to be noticed.” In modern day society, male leggings are remarkable. The man who sold his life on eBay is remarkable: The Ryanair CEO announcing that they will introduce standing seats to charge for toilets is remarkable: “But what if my startup is inherently unremarkable?” Great question. And a question that we were forced to ask ourselves in preparation for the upcoming launch of a startup that we are working on. While preparing for the launch of Virtual Valley, software that connects entrepreneurs with virtual team members such as assistants, we found ourselves struggling to differentiate it from Upwork — a freelancing platform that operates very similarly. Considering sources such as TechCrunch are unlikely to cover your startup launch if...

Apple TV Brawl results: Apple solidly wins the 4K debate for now – and here’s why

Yesterday, we gave you the chance to speak your mind on Apple’s choice to omit 4K video support from the latest Apple TV — did Apple blow it, or does 4K support not yet matter? After over 6,500 votes, and more than 125 comments, we have a clear answer: roughly 2/3 of readers said Apple made the right call leaving 4K support out of the Apple TV, as they didn’t care (yet) about the feature. That’s a decisive majority. But a solid 35% of readers opined — often strongly — that neglecting 4K support had cost Apple their business, given that 4K Ultra HD TVs are becoming affordable and more popular. I hoped we’d see some intelligent discussion, and was thrilled that so many comments actually delivered, including insights on why Apple’s approach was practical — for now. Here are some of the best comments readers posted on each side of the debate… Representing the 65% of users who said “No, I don’t care about Apple TV 4K support (yet),” the most common thread was that 4K content currently isn’t compelling enough to be a necessity, particularly in a low-end Apple TV, and mightn’t be for 2 years. 4K is just not an issue right now. And I don’t see much need to future proof a $150 item.   – Jon C The reality is that 4K is not “there” yet. [1080p] HD is where +95% of current content is filmed and distributed. Why would I stress future proofing a $150 device? By the time 4k is ubiquitous enough to make it a no brainer that generation of Apple TV will have enough features to make...

Opinion: Apple had a good year for product launches in 2015, despite unrealistic expectations from some

The view that Apple lost its innovative edge with the sad loss of Steve Jobs has been one of the oft-repeated criticisms of the company in recent years. But this idea is based on an entirely mythological view of Apple as a company that was constantly launching ground-breaking new product categories. The reality is a little more mundane. The Macintosh, a truly revolutionary computer, was launched in 1984. We had to wait 17 years for the next groundbreaking product: the iPod in 2001. We had to wait six years after that for the next major product category: the iPhone in 2007. And a further three years for the iPad in 2010. (If you wanted to push things a little, you could argue that the MacBook Air was also so revolutionary that it deserves to be included; if so, we’re up to five new product categories in 26 years.) Note, too, that none of the product categories were invented by Apple. Xerox, of course, invented the graphical user interface for personal computers. There were MP3 players before the iPod; touchscreen smartphones before the iPhone; tablets before the iPad. What Apple did in each case was what the company does best: take something clunky and used only by techies, and turn it into a slick product that will appeal to the masses. So no, Apple never has churned out revolutionary new products on an annual basis. If we’re going to assess its performance today, it has to be against a realistic background. Zac recently reminded us of Apple’s product timeline for 2015. Looking at this in the context of a company whose true history is occasionally taking...

This is how AAPL could prove pessimists wrong in holiday quarter iPhone sales – analyst

There have been a number of predictions that Apple will next year report a year-on-year decline in iPhone shipments for the current quarter, KGI among them. Most such reports are based on extrapolating from supply chain data which attempts to estimate production volumes. These reports contrast with Apple’s own guidance for record revenue of $75.5B to $77.5B. Tim Cook argued in October that some two-thirds of existing customers are still using older phones, leaving plenty of room for upgrades this quarter, and that Apple is winning over Android owners in record numbers. One analyst believes he knows how the conflict can be resolved… AAPL has had a very close eye on being able to achieve what has become a Dec Q Street iPhone estimate of 76M – 78M; we think that the company can deliver this number by building 70M – 75M and shipping the balance from inventory. In other words, while it may have made fewer iPhone 6s/Plus models this quarter (calendar Q4 2015, Apple’s fiscal Q1 2016), it can more than make up the difference from existing stocks of older models, reports Business Insider  Beating last year’s numbers would be quite an achievement. In 2014, the iPhone didn’t go on sale in China until the holiday quarter, meaning plenty of pent-up demand; this year, China was a launch country, so there’s no equivalent artificial boost. The number to beat? 74.4M iPhones. We’ll find out next month. Photo: William West/AFP/Getty Images Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: AAPL, Apple Inc, iPhone, iPhone sales Q1 2016 Visit 9to5Mac to find more special coverage of iOS Devices, iPhone, and Apple Inc. What do you think? Discuss “This is how AAPL could prove pessimists wrong...