27 of the Best Website Designs to Inspire You in 2019

Every once in a while, I’ll come across a website that really draws me in. So, I found 27 of them to show you. These sites push the boundaries of what is known to be possible on the web. Whether it’s the design aesthetic, usability, interactivity, sound design, or value that the site provides, each one is a masterpiece in its respective industry, and something to be inspired by. Not surprisingly, many organizations exist to highlight these sites and the contributions they make to the web. To help surface some of the most inspirational designs, I gathered 21 award-winners that have made their way through several key awards organizations — including Awwwards, UX Awards, The Webby Awards, SiteInspire, Best Website Gallery, and FWA. Click the links below to jump to a group of website designs that crushed it in the last several years: Best Website Designs from 2014 – 2015 Best Website Designs from 2016 Best Website Designs from 2017 Best Website Designs from 2018 Below this list, I also found six more websites whose homepage designs are just plain cool and worth learning from. As you browse through the list, know that each site excels in its own way and seeks to serve a unique purpose. While one site may be an excellent example of visual design, another may be an excellent example of interactivity. This means that not all of these sites may be “conversion machines” or blueprint ideas that you can easily copy over to your site. Rather, they’re great ways to gain some website design inspiration and see the cutting-edge marketing that’s happening in the...

Checkout on Instagram and Sponsored Stories Polling Stickers

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore Instagram’s new in-app checkout and polling in sponsored stories with our special guest, Rebekah Radice. Watch the […] The post Checkout on Instagram and Sponsored Stories Polling Stickers appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner. from Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner https://ift.tt/2JRkKdD via...

An Introduction to Brand Dilution, Extensions, and Cannibalization

You might know Cadbury for their high-end chocolate and candy, but did you know they sold instant mashed potatoes from the early 1960s to the mid 1980s? Image Credit: Geek Goes Vintage Smash, their instant mashed potato brand, surprisingly reached mainstream success. But, unfortunately, it was at the expense of lowering their flagship product’s perceived quality. Cadbury is a premium confectionery company, so when they started producing low-end food products, like instant mashed potatoes, it’s not shocking to learn that their association with the finest chocolates weakened. Eventually, in 1986, Cadbury sold Smash, only 20 years after they introduced their instant mashed potatoes to the world. Cadbury’s expansion into instant mashed potatoes created a new revenue stream and even generated more sales for them, but it damaged their brand as a whole. This phenomena is called brand dilution, and, below, we’ll dive into it, as well as other related concepts called brand extensions and brand cannibalization. Brand Dilution Brand dilution is when a company’s brand equity diminishes due to an unsuccessful brand extension, which is a new product the company develops in an industry that they don’t have any market share in, like Reese’s Puff Cereal or Gerber’s baby clothes. Brand Extension Companies leverage their existing brand awareness and equity to develop brand extensions that create new revenue streams. However, an unsuccessful brand extension, like Zippo’s perfume for women or Samsonite’s outerwear, can attach undesirable associations to their brand, weaken its existing associations, and hurt its established products’ perceived quality, which can all lead to brand dilution. When does brand dilution occur? According to two marketing professors from Dartmouth College and UCLA,...

What Is Semi-Structured Data?

To consider what semi-structured data is, let’s start with an analogy — interviewing. Let’s say you’re conducting a semi-structured interview. This, as the name implies, falls somewhere in-between a structured and unstructured interview. For context, a structured interview is one in which the questions being asked, as well as the order in which they are asked, is pre-determined by your HR team and consistent for each candidate. An unstructured interview, on the other hand, is one in which the questions, and the order in which they are asked, is up to the discretion of the interviewer — and could be entirely different for each candidate. When you consider these two extremes, you can begin to see the benefits of semi-structured interviews, which are fairly consistent and quantitative (like a structured interview), but still provide the interviewer with a window for building rapport, and asking follow-up questions. Semi-structured data is similar in nature to a semi-structured interview — it’s not as messy and uncontrolled as unstructured data, but not as rigid and readily quantifiable as structured data. What Is Semi Structured Data Semi-structured data is information that does not reside in a relational database or any other data table, but nonetheless has some organizational properties to make it easier to analyze, such as semantic tags. A good example of semi-structured data is HTML code, which doesn’t restrict the amount of information you want to collect in a document, but still enforces hierarchy via semantic elements. Here, we’re going to explore the difference between structured, semi-structured, and unstructured data to ensure you have a good understanding of the terms. Structured, Semi-Structured,...