31 Call-to-Action Examples You Can’t Help But Click

Think about all the times you’ve signed up for things in your life. Did you once download Evernote? Dropbox? Spotify? Maybe you’ve even taken a class on General Assembly. Each one of these signups is likely a result of an effective call-to-action (CTA). It’s really important to guide your visitors through the buying journey using strategic CTAs. Think about it: If you hadn’t been drawn in by the copy or design of the CTA, or been guided so eloquently through your sign-up process, you would probably use a lot fewer apps and websites than you do now. Here are a few different actions an audience can get called to carry out: Sign up. In this type of CTA, the audience might be invited to sign up for a free trial, an online course, a future event, or even a software product. It all depends on the CTAs context on an ad or website. Subscribe. This CTA doesn’t commit a person to a purchase. Rather, it invites them to receive updates from the company. “Subscribe” CTAs are common to company blogs, for which the business wants to develop a readership. Try for free. Nearly every company website has a free trial offer today. Each of them are CTAs of this variety, and they allow people to demo a product before deciding if it’s worth the cost to them. Get started. This CTA can drive a variety of behaviors for a company, from a free trial to virtual reality experience. Learn more. Sometimes, all you want is to give your potential customers a little more information so they’re prepared to buy...

The State of Content Marketing 2019 [Infographic]

The results of the third annual State of Content Marketing Survey are now in — the findings include victories, challenges, and trends. With three years of data behind us, we can see just how much growth the content marketing world has achieved. But we haven’t reached perfection yet. Three years ago, only 6% of marketers felt they knew what a successful marketing campaign really looked like — in 2019, that number has increased to more than a third of marketers. Additionally, if we look back to 2017, just 70% of marketers found marketing to be effective for their brand. Much of that was driven by a distinct lack of knowledge around its use. Now, 96% of marketers say their deeper understanding is translating to results — and into a fully integrated marketing strategy. You can see some of the highlights from the survey in the infographic below. If you’d like to read the full results, you can download them...

6 of the Best Video Formats for 2019

As a video marketer, you know there’s no cookie-cutter approach to crafting engaging videos. Each of your stories have unique concepts, contexts, and characters, so you need to account for these variables in the creative process in order to craft a video that tells your story in the most authentic and compelling way possible. The same principle applies to choosing video formats. There is no one-size-fits-all video format — not every computer, video platform, or website browser supports every video format. Fortunately, we’ve rounded up the best video formats around and listed out their pros and cons so you can learn which video format to use in different situations. 6 of the Best Video Formats for 2019 1. MP4 Most digital devices and platforms support MP4, rendering it the most universal video format around. The MP4 can also store video files, audio files, text, and still images. Additionally, they can retain high video quality while maintaining relatively small file sizes. 2. MOV Developed by Apple, MOV is the video format specifically designed for QuickTime Player. But since there’s a version of QuickTimePlayer for Windows, MOV is also compatible with Windows. The MOV video format can store audio, text, and video effects, but since its quality is usually so high, it’ll take up significantly more space on people’s computer. 3. WMV WMV was developed by Microsoft, so your audience can play these types of videos on Windows Media Player. If they have a Mac, though, they can just download a WMV player to play WMV videos. Just like the MOV format, the WMV format boasts high video quality but its at the expense...

4 Ways to Use Google Tag Manager With Facebook

Wondering how to easily install Facebook features on your website without editing the code? In this article, you’ll discover easy ways to install the Facebook pixel, the Facebook Messenger customer chat plugin, alerts for Facebook comments, and Facebook standard events with Google Tag Manager. Install Google Tag Manager on Your Website Google Tag Manager is […] The post 4 Ways to Use Google Tag Manager With Facebook appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner. from Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner http://bit.ly/2GNz7ut via...

5 Marketing Plan Examples to Help You Write Your Own

You did it. You’ve been spearheading your organization’s content marketing efforts for a while now, and your team’s performance has convinced your boss to fully adopt content marketing. There’s one small problem, though. your boss wants you to write and present a content marketing plan to her, but you’ve never done something like that before. You don’t even know where to start. Fortunately, we’ve curated the best content marketing plans to help you write a concrete marketing plan that’s rooted in data and produces real results. Read on to find out what a marketing plan is and how some of the best marketing plans implement strategies that serve their respective businesses. Click the following links to jump to a specific section of this blog post: What is a marketing plan? How to Write a Marketing Plan Marketing Plan Examples Keep in mind that there’s a difference between a marketing plan and a marketing strategy. Marketing Strategy vs. Marketing Plan A marketing strategy describes how a business will accomplish a particular mission or goal. This includes which campaigns, content, channels, and marketing software they’ll use to execute on that mission and track its success. A marketing plan contains one or more marketing strategies. It is the framework from which all of your marketing strategies are created, and helps you connect each strategy back to a larger marketing operation and business goal. Let’s say, for example, your company is launching a new software product it wants customers to sign up for. This calls for the marketing department to develop a marketing plan that’ll help introduce this product to the industry and...