6 Ways Marketing Content Can Support a Customer Service Team

“Hold on, let me just confirm the solution for you,” the service rep responds as she scrambles to look up the answer to a customer’s question. It’s the corporate equivalent of a retail employee wandering aimlessly down each aisle when you ask where a certain product is, like you couldn’t have done that yourself. Customers will eventually stump customer service (a department sometimes known as customer success, if it’s more focused on proactive goal-setting than reactive troubleshooting) with a question they ask over the phone or in a live chat window. And that’s okay; it’s hard to always have all the answers at the ready. What’s not okay is when this becomes a pattern — customer success employees seeming puzzled by the same problems or questions every time their clients bring them up. Does this sound like the situation at your company? Consider tapping your marketing department to fill those knowledge gaps. You may have heard the term “smarketing,” which describes the ideal alignment of Marketing and Sales through shared goals and direct communication. What if I told you the same alignment could benefit Marketing and Customer Success, too? There’s a critical opportunity for both Marketing and Customer Success to help each other better serve their common audience. Here are six ways Marketing can help customer success managers (CSMs) and service reps transform the client experience, and the benefit Marketing can receive in return. 6 Ways Marketing Content Can Support a Customer Service Team 1. Distilling Marketing Content Into Monthly Digests Customer Success might already receive their company blog’s newsletter, but their conversations with clients can benefit from more...

Your Email Strategy Needs a Facebook Messenger Strategy

As of late, it feels like an arms race between email marketing or Messenger marketing. A world where marketers have to pick: the workhorse of today or the most exciting channel of tomorrow? At first glance, I can see why. We’ve seen audiences engage an insane amount on Messenger — 619% more than email. There’s also a cool 1.3 billion people who use Messenger on a regular basis. When companies ask me which one to use, my answer surprises them: have your cake and eat it, too. Email and Messenger together will make your business more money than picking one. Which one you should use when — and for whom — comes down to context. Here are three things to consider as you decide which areas of your marketing strategy need email, and which need Messenger. Purpose Every interaction your company has with someone needs a purpose. All communication should be deliberate, whether it’s with a prospect or a customer. Your marketing goal will determine whether email or Messenger makes more sense. In some cases, you have a lot to say — or show. That’s a big reason email remains the channel of choice for long-form communication. Email wins at getting lengthy points across that people can store and share later. More often than not, though, most marketing and sales emails I get don’t fall into that camp. “Chatting with you > Talking at you” This is where Messenger’s shorter communication style thrives. When you get an email, it feels like companies are talking at you. With Messenger, those same companies are chatting with you. It also pays to...

How to Manage Your Entire Marketing Budget [Free Budget Tracker Templates]

Here’s a hypothetical for you: Let’s say your company has decided to invest in a website redesign so you can improve lead generation, and you’re responsible for managing the project. Naturally, one of the first questions you have is, “How much is this website redesign going to cost?” The answer, of course, is “it depends.” Are you simply switching to a new template and adding some new CTAs, or are you migrating your entire website to a new platform? If only there were a way to organize your answers to all of these questions — a place where you could enter in estimated costs for all of your line items, and then compare your projected marketing budget to what you actually end up spending … Good news! Our latest offer, 8 Free Budget Templates to Manage Your Marketing Spend, has got you covered. Included in our eight budget templates bundle is a template to manage your website redesign … as well as templates for both Excel and Google Sheets to help you track your content budget, paid advertising budget, event budget, and more. Click here to download your 8 free marketing budget templates. Here’s a peek: Aligning Your Budget With Your Marketing Goals What you spend and where you spend it will depend on what you’re trying to accomplish. This is especially true when it comes to paid advertising like search and display ads, social media ads, and so on. HubSpot’s former Demand Generation Marketer and Trello’s current Product Marketing Manager, Jessica Webb, says this about how your costs can change when focusing on lead generation vs. lead conversion:...

Think Twitter Automation Is the Answer to Efficiency? Think Again.

Twitter announced today that it will impose major restrictions on the use of automation and bulk-tweeting tools. It’s the latest in a series of moves by Twitter to combat the spread of spam, false information, or bots on its network.  The motivation behind these new restrictions is to significantly limit the amount of identical information — like that containing false information or propaganda — being tweeted out by multiple accounts. Why Twitter Has Imposed These Restrictions That sort of activity is often conducted on platforms designed for Twitter automation and what’s also known as “bulk tweeting,” in which identical tweets are scheduled in advance to be sent out by multiple accounts, or sent by one and retweeted by several others. In fact, according to the official announcement — penned by Twitter’s Manager of Trust and Safety, Yoel Roth — Twitter has even incorporated changes to its own platform of this kind, TweetDeck, to reflect these new rules.  “Users of TweetDeck,” wrote Roth on the Twitter Developer Blog, “will no longer be able to select multiple accounts through which to perform an action such as Tweeting, Retweeting, liking, or following.” Twitter is among many online communities that are continuously working to make improvements to the way they’re used and can be manipulated, as the investigation into the weaponization of such networks to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election proceeds. Medium also announced policy changes today, and Facebook recently introduced a pen-and-paper authentication method for candidates looking to run political campaign ads on its own platform. “A stunning amount of information has come to the light about the magnitude of disinformation spread...

15 Marketing Job Titles For the Skill Sets You Want at Your Company

There are some weird job titles cropping up across the globe, and I bet you’ll never guess what the most popular one was in the U.S. last year for that category. It was “rockstar” — followed closely by “guru” and “ninja.” You read that right. Ninja. Contrary to the images they conjure, these titles weren’t written to attract musicians and covert assassins. They were intended to appeal to experts in their respective industries. A “customer experience ninja,” for example, finds ways to improve how clients engage with the brand. S/he’s just so good at it, you don’t even know s/he’s there, “killing” it at every point in the buyer’s journey. An “SEO guru” might own all tasks related to search engine optimization, and, as a callback to the teacher origins of “guru,” educate the marketing department on the latest Google best practices. This doesn’t mean you need to (or should) fill your careers page with flashy marketing job titles to reach the talent you want. It does, however, show how quickly the naming conventions are changing along with the practices that help a business grow. You need to compete for talented marketers’ attention, and they’re looking for job titles in marketing that denote their specific value to the market, and help their careers grow, too. “Marketing coordinator,” “digital specialist,” and similarly generic terms often don’t encompass the responsibilities of today’s marketer — even those who might be coming to your company right from college. And many marketing leaders are feeling the effects of this shift — 95% of them say their organizations are struggling in some way because they...