Unriddled: Instagram Data Downloads, Amazon’s Big Reveal, and More Tech News You Need

Welcome to Wednesday, and the latest edition of “Unriddled”: the HubSpot Marketing Blog’s mid-week digest of the tech news you need to know. This week is big on news from Amazon — from Robots, to user numbers, to in-car deliveries. But that’s not the only thing happening around tech town, and we’re here to help decrypt what’s happening in this big, wide sector. It’s our Wednesday tech news roundup, and we’re breaking it down. Unriddled: The Tech News You Need 1. We Finally Know How Many Prime Members Amazon Has In an annual letter written last week to shareholders, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos disclosed a long-sought-after figure by analysts and tech writers alike: how many Prime members it has. The grand total, he wrote, has “exceeded 100 million.” Amazon Prime is a paid subscription model (for an annual fee of $99, or $12.99 per month) offered by online retailing giant Amazon, offering such perks as free two-day delivery on many products, as well as free streaming videos and music selections. In certain regions, a membership also includes free two-hour delivery of certain items through a service called Prime Now. Just yesterday, Amazon announced the launch of In-Car Delivery, which allows Prime members to have Amazon packages delivered to their cars if they’re parked at home, work, or near other locations in your address book.” However, it does come with eligibility requirements, depending on the make and model of your car, and your location.   Source: Apple Paid Prime membership numbers, as well as some of the other figures cited in Bezos’s letter, are likely to come up the company’s Q1 2018...

How to Delete Your Facebook Account, Group, or Page [Easy Guide]

There are a lot of reasons you might be thinking about deleting your Facebook account — perhaps you think you spend too much time on it and want to take a social media cleanse, or maybe you and your friends have already stopped using it, so there’s no reason to keep it around. It’s important to understand deleting your Facebook account is different from deactivating your account — once deleted, it can never be recovered. Which means, if you’re intent on getting rid of your account for temporary detox purposes, you might want to consider alternative methods to detoxing from social media without deleting anything. But if you’re sure you’re ready to leave the world’s most popular social media network, it’s a simple process. Keep in mind, if you delete your Facebook, your photos and all your Facebook information will be lost forever. If you want to save that information, I’d suggest downloading a copy of it. To download a copy of all your Facebook information, go to “Settings” and click, “Download a copy of your Facebook data,” and then, “Start My Archive.” This will ensure you can still find all those awkward middle school photos, years down the road. To find out how to delete or deactivate your Facebook account, or delete a group or page you’ve created, read on. How to Delete or Deactivate Your Facebook Account How to Delete Facebook Go to https://ift.tt/2hxTdPL Click “delete my account” Do not log back into Facebook and wait 14 days for the deletion request to complete Once you’re sure you’re ready to delete your Facebook account permanantly, click this...

The 15 Best Video Editing Apps for 2018

If you’re reading this blog post, chances are you already know you should incorporate more video content into your marketing. But like most new strategies, you might need to prove its ROI before you get budget. And that can be tricky, because to make a great video, you need a few things — like a camera and editing software. You might already have a high-quality camera built into your smartphone, but editing your raw footage and preparing it for publication requires a third-party mobile app. You might even need to hop on the computer for the more extensive post-production projects. There’s a good chance you already have video editing software installed on your computer. For Windows, that’s Windows Movie Maker, and for Macs, it’s iMovie. But depending on the purpose your video is serving — and the content channel to which you’re distributing it — you may find that these options aren’t packed with enough features. The good news: There are several free and inexpensive video editing apps and tools you can download that run the gamut from super simple to Hollywood-level powerful. The following 15 solutions can help you make video magic — whether your video is meant for Instagram, YouTube, or a similar channel where you audience is hungry for content. Best Video Editing Software Magisto Hyperlapse Wondershare FilmoraGo InShot WeVideo Splice Adobe Premiere Clip PicPlayPost Blender Lightworks Shotcut VSDC Free Video Editor Machete Video Editor Lite Avidemux HitFilm Instagram Video Editing Apps The following apps allow you to edit and quickly upload beautiful videos to Instagram. None of these apps are limited to Instagram, but are...

How to Write a Business Plan: A Step-by-Step Guide [Examples + Template]

How to Write a Business Plan Write an executive summary. Describe your company and business model. Analyze your market’s conditions. Explain your product and/or service. Outline all operations & management roles. Design a marketing & sales strategy. Detail a financial plan with business costs, funding, and revenue projections. Summarize the above with an appendix. Not all business ideas are good ones. Take my friend Eric, for example, who had the idea of a cell phone that doubles as a taser. Probably not the best product to have on the market. A lot of people have business ideas — it’s whether these ideas are any good that really matters. That’s precisely why, if you intend to actually build a business from your idea, it’s helpful to create a business plan so you can build out your concept in detail and prove that it can really work, both logistically and financially. What Is a Business Plan? A business plan is a living document that maps out the details of your business. It covers what your business will sell, how it will be structured, what the market looks like, how you plan to sell your product or service, what funding you’ll need, what your financial projections are, and which permits, leases, and other documentation will be required. At its core, a business plan helps you prove to yourself and others whether or not your business idea is worth pursuing. It’s the best way to take a step back, look at your idea holistically, and solve for issues years down the road before you start getting into the weeds. This post covers tips...

20 Questions to Ask When Creating Buyer Personas [Free Template]

Buyer personas are a crucial component of successful inbound marketing, particularly for the sales and marketing departments. After all, the marketing team needs to know to whom they are marketing, and the sales team needs to know to whom they are selling. But once you sit down to craft your buyer personas, you may find yourself staring blankly at a white screen for some time, wondering where on earth you’re supposed to begin. Download our free buyer persona template here to learn how to create buyer personas for your business. Before you spend time and money on research, ask yourself the questions below to help you develop your personas, then use our free buyer persona template above to share your personas with the rest of your company.  Keep in mind you’ll need a content marketing strategy to reach your buyer persona. Want to learn the process? Check out HubSpot Academy’s free content marketing training resource page. 20 Buyer Persona Questions to Ask When Identifying Your Audience Questions About Their Personal Background 1. Describe your personal demographics. Collecting demographic information is a great place to begin drafting your personas because it’s easy to obtain and starts to paint a clearer, more personal picture of your customer. Are they married? What’s their annual household income? Where do they live? Are they male or female? How old are they? Do they have children? 2. Describe your educational background. What level of education did they complete? Which schools did they attend, and what did they study? Get specific here. “Boston University” is better than “liberal arts college.” 3. Describe your career path. How did they...

Facebook Has Published Its Internal Community Standards and Will Roll out a New Appeals Process

Facebook has published its internal enforcement guidelines.  These guidelines — or community standards, as they’re also known — are designed to help human moderators decide what content should (not) be allowed on Facebook. Now, the social network wants the public to know how such decisions are made. “We decided to publish these internal guidelines for two reasons,” wrote Facebook’s VP of Global Product Management Monica Bickert in a statement. “First, the guidelines will help people understand where we draw the line on nuanced issues.” “Second,” the statement continues, “providing these details makes it easier for everyone, including experts in different fields, to give us feedback so that we can improve the guidelines – and the decisions we make – over time.” Facebook’s content moderation practices have been the topic of much discussion and, at times, contention. At CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s congressional hearings earlier this month, several lawmakers asked about the removal or suppression of certain content that they believed was based on political orientation. And later this week, the House Judiciary Committee will host yet another hearing on the “filtering practices of social media platforms,” where witnesses from Facebook, Google, and Twitter have been invited to testify — though none have confirmed their attendance. What the Standards Look Like According to a tally from The Verge reporter Casey Newton, the newly-released community standards total 27 pages, and are divided into six main sections: Violence and Criminal Behavior Safety Objectionable Content Integrity and Authenticity Respecting Intellectual Property Content-Related Requests Within these sections, the guidelines delve deeper into the moderation of content that might promote or indicate things like threats to public safety, bullying,...