19 Awesome SEO Blogs and Websites You’ll Want to Bookmark

Search engine optimization (SEO) standards are constantly changing. Like social media, email marketing, and emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), search engines are improving the way in which they deliver results to users every day. To do this, they’re focusing on things like localization, page authority, click-through rate, and even searches that come from voice assistants like Amazon Alexa and Google...

How to Fire Someone: A Step-by-Step Guide to Letting an Employee Go

To terminate is to bring to an end. And if you’ve ever had to figure out how to terminate an employee, you know things don’t get much harder or sadder. Most managers dread this part of the job more than any other. And frankly, you should feel a little dread when parting ways with an employee — it’s what makes you human. Luckily, there are some steps you can take to ensure the conversation goes smoothly. Due to feelings of guilt, uncertainty about the decision, legal concerns, and excuses by the team member, many managers don’t let poor performers go when they should (or at all). And when they do take action, almost every termination conversation is stressful. But keeping poor performers on the team is a disservice to other team members, clients, the organization, and even to the employee in question. Lower standards are infectious and can bring down the aspiration level of other team members, and poor performers often incite resentment. Taking action puts other low performers on notice, helps managers meet goals, and ensures clients get the value and care they need. Time and time again I have been told by colleagues and managers who have lost their jobs that the worst part wasn’t the termination itself but how the message was delivered. To quote one colleague, “The message was dropped like a bomb.” When it is time to let a team member go, the process you use — while it does not change the result — significantly alters the experience and reduces chances of litigation. Knowing how to terminate an employee properly makes managers more...

How to Delete Twitter [Easy Guide]

There are a few reasons you might be considering deleting Twitter. Maybe your friends don’t use it anymore. Perhaps you spend too much time on it, and believe you’d be more productive without it. Whatever the reason, it’s easy to deactivate your Twitter account. Twitter even gives you a 30 day grace period to reactivate your account, in case you change your mind. However, it should be noted once the 30 days end, your account is gone forever. If you’re ready to permanently delete your Twitter account, follow these five simple steps. How to delete Twitter Sign into your Twitter account Click “Settings and privacy” from the drop-down menu under your profile icon In the Accounts section, click “Deactivate your account” Click “Deactivate” Input your password, and click “Deactivate account” 1. Once you’ve signed into your Twitter account, click your profile icon to find the drop-down menu. Within the menu, select “Settings and privacy”. 2. In the Accounts section, click “Deactivate your account”. 3. Click “Deactivate”. 4. Input your password, and click “Deactivate account”. And that’s it! You’ve officially deleted your account (remember, you have 30 days to reactivate if you change your mind). For more productivity hacks, check out “The Ultimate Guide to the Best Productivity...

How to Get More Engagement With Facebook Live

Want more people to watch, share, and comment on your live videos? Looking for tips on improving the quality of viewer engagement? To explore how to get more engagement with Facebook Live video, I interview Stephanie Liu. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and […] The post How to Get More Engagement With Facebook Live appeared first on Social Media Examiner. from Social Media Examiner https://ift.tt/2Dkz3nE via...

How Cognitive Computing Can Make You a Better Marketer

When Sophia, a robot who uses artificial intelligence to interact with humans (like Jimmy Fallon) visited my college last year, I was awestruck. At first, I thought Sophia would have a similar intelligence level as a simple bot, like Siri, who can only hold basic conversations and address straightforward questions and requests. But when Sophia’s developer started asking her questions, she completely debunked my assumption. She was articulate, made animated facial expressions, and had a surprisingly quick wit. Sophia’s ability to intellectually and socially interact with people seems like one of the most exciting advancements in artificial intelligence. But the thing is, she can’t actually understand conversation — her software is programmed to give scripted responses to common questions or phrases, creating an illusion that she’s naturally interacting with you. If developers want to create computer systems that can actually interact with humans naturally, they need to program cognitive computing into its software, which is a technology that can understand, learn, and reason like a real person. Cognitive computing can analyze enormous amounts of data in the same way humans think, reason, and remember, so the technology can provide data-backed recommendations to professionals who need to make high-stakes decisions. For instance, teachers can develop a personalized learning track for each of their students, doctors can make optimal recommendations for their patients, and marketers can even use cognitive computing to craft more human-centric customer journeys. Before we delve into how brands are applying cognitive computing to their marketing strategy, though, let’s go over what it exactly is. What is cognitive computing? Cognitive computing blends cognitive science, which is the study...