15 Creative Exercises That Are Better Than Brainstorming

We’re all familiar with traditional brainstorming as a way to produce new ideas. You sit in a room with a whiteboard and work with whatever comes to mind. Maybe you play a few rounds of word association to strengthen your ideas, or pull up Google and use research to flesh them out. But there are many alternative exercises for tackling problems and developing new ideas, both individually and in a group setting. Ranging from structured to silly, here are 15 creative brainstorming exercises and techniques to help you get your problem-solving juices flowing. Brainstorming Techniques Storyboarding Mind Mapping Group Sketching Word Banking S.C.A.M.P.E.R. S.W.O.T. Analysis Six Thinking Hats Zero Draft Brain Netting Questioning Assumptions Wishing Alter-Egos / Heroes Forced Connections Reverse Brainstorming Brain-Writing Visual Activities 1. Storyboarding If you’re trying to design a process, storyboarding can help you see where your collective understanding of a problem supports or conflicts with a proposed solution, and where more thought/research is needed. By developing a visual story to explore the problem at hand as a narrative, your team will be able to see how ideas interact and connect to form a solution. Sticky notes are your friend. Take a few minutes to have everyone on the team write out their ideas as individual notes. These don’t have to be complete thoughts — physically pinning up quotes, pictures, user info, and the like can help you see new relationships between different components. Once you have a group of sticky notes to work from, start arranging them on the board as a progression: first this, then that. Organizing your ideas as a continuous series...

New LinkedIn Ads Features

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore new LinkedIn ads features and Snapchat partnering with Amazon on new visual search tools. Our special guest […] The post New LinkedIn Ads Features appeared first on Social Media Examiner. from Social Media Examiner https://ift.tt/2IoIMIt via...

How to Write a Professional Resignation Letter [Samples + Template]

Telling your boss that you’re leaving the company is never an easy conversation. But a respectful resignation letter can mean the difference between an awkward goodbye, and a chance for a long-term professional connection. Ideally, you’ll provide a resignation letter two weeks before you leave the company. A resignation letter lets you officially announce your termination at the company, and also provides important housekeeping information, like your last day and other details about your departure. Arming yourself with a powerful resignation letter helps you ensure a positive conversation with your boss, and a smooth transition to your next journey. But how do you write a good resignation letter? What should you include, and exclude? Writing a resignation letter can feel like a daunting task, so we’ve created a professional resignation letter template to get you started, and included examples for inspiration. How to Write a Professional Resignation Letter (Template) Below is a professional resignation letter template. Remember, your letter should be brief, and only include relevant and helpful information. Don’t focus on the advantages of your next role. Instead, take the time to reflect on any appreciation you feel for the company you’re leaving behind.   Your Name Your Address Your City, State, Zip Code Your Phone Number Your Email   Date   Name Title Organization Address City, State, Zip Code   Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name:   I would like to inform you that I am resigning from my position as X for Company A, effective December 21. I appreciate the opportunities for professional development that you have provided me over the past two years. I have enjoyed my...

Why This New VR Headset Could Be a Game-Changer

There are some days that make us want to escape reality. And it could be said that there’s no better place to do that than a conference dedicated entirely to virtual reality (VR).  This week saw the fifth occurrence of Oculus Connect: Facebook’s annual VR conference. And while this year was a bit skimpy on flashy product announcements, it did see the debut of the latest in the company’s line of VR headsets, the Oculus Quest. A natural skeptic, I wondered what made the Quest so special. What merited its $399 price tag (as opposed to the $199 Go, an earlier wireless Oculus headset)? And why did Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg describe it as “just wonderful” during the event’s opening keynote? FB has been prototyping this for a while under the code name Project Santa Cruz. Now it’s an official consumer product. “It’s just wonderful,” Zuckerberg says https://t.co/CJbZrTIAkE — Kurt Wagner (@KurtWagner8) September 26, 2018 To find out, I decided to take it for a spin. The Oculus Quest Experience Whenever I try a new VR headset, I immediately have to warn the person running the demo that I historically get motion sickness from the technology. I’m not alone (that’s probably why they keep a bowl of ginger candies at the demo stations) but with the Oculus’s two existing headsets, the Rift and the Go, I’ve had to end the demonstrations after only a few minutes. But the gentleman running this demo, Thomas, told me that this experience might be different. “A lot of people have told me that,” he said, “and then tell me they don’t have that...

The Straightforward Guide to Twitter Analytics

When it launched in 2014, Twitter Analytics marked a solid (if long overdue) move toward greater transparency and measurement abilities for all its users. Since then, Twitter has continued to make upgrades to the tool, having created a standalone analytics app called Engage in 2016 and launching analytics for Twitter Moments. Though users now have more insight into their Twitter account metrics, you might not be using this data to its full potential. Perhaps you’ve poked around the Twitter Analytics homepage and figured out you can track impressions and metrics by promoted or organic activity … and that’s about it. The good news is there’s much more you can discover in your Tweet activity dashboard — you’ve just need to know where to look. Beyond the basic metrics, here are some incredibly important things you can discover about your Twitter account and audience using Tweet Analytics. How to Use Twitter Analytics You can access Twitter Analytics by tapping your profile and selecting “Analytics” from the dropdown menu: 1. See Which Content Resonates With Your Audience Understanding which types of content and topics your audience members most enjoy can help drive your social marketing and content strategy. What’s the point in sharing content no one cares about or enjoys? On the “Tweets” tab, you can see Impressions, Engagements and Engagement Rate (Engagements divided by Impressions) for each tweet, for paid and organic posts. Engagements include all activity on the tweet: retweets, follows, replies, favorites, and all clicks on the tweet, link, hashtag, etc. For a more granular view of the volume of each type of engagement, you can click on...